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to make sure that you can make transactions without anybody tracing them back to you and finding out what they are is a world that doesn’t have hacks and banks. If we trusted our banks and our transactions that we make online then everything would be fine. But we’re giving away our CVV number and cyber- criminals are picking that up.”


Buchanan says resilience must be built into data infrastructure, so that it is part of the “core design”. Critical national infrastructure is largely getting it right, he adds, but there are still too many fault lines that are being exposed, which can create havoc. He references a recent hack at Bristol Airport, which took down the arrivals and departures screens following a ransomware attack. “Just imagine if that had jumped over


into the air traffic control system and then affected all of the air traffic control systems,” he says. Tere is a great deal of interest


in blockchain in both the com- mercial world, and in the public sector; the Scottish Government is no exception, and it commis- sioned the blockchain company Wallet Services to produce a report, Distributed Ledger Technologies in Public Services, earlier this year. Unsurprisingly, it concluded: “Tis research found an overwhelming international consensus that DLT will have a significant role in un- derpinning future digital govern- ment.” Buchanan agrees, though:


“Scotland needs to be more pro- risk, and have far superior visions rather than short-term objectives of getting us past the next election; in 2025 every public sector contract


should be run on smart contracts. I think we should have a grand vision for what the country should look like and so social change, because small countries can do this well.” He adds: “I think we see Block-


chain version one as the Bitcoin world; but storing data on a block- chain isn’t really building a new world. Blockchain of the future will be built on smart contracts and we will implement those. If you have a GP appointment then the smart contract that runs within an NHS network will automatically trigger when you are over 65 years old; you will be able to walk onto a bus in Edinburgh which will identify you and you automatically get free bus travel without filling in forms. Tere’s a number of things that we do – we give our date of birth on forms, but why can’t we just


JOIN THE CYBERSECURITY DEBATE AT DIGITALSCOTLAND, FUTURESCOT’SANNUAL CONFERENCE ON MAY 30TH, 2019 – VISIT FUTURESCOTEVENTS.COM


store what our date of birth is once, and that will prove our identity? Te core of it is much better trust; when I sign a parcel from Amazon, I draw a little line across the screen and that is seen as my identity. I think what we have is old methods and what we’re finding in this information age is that we really have to stop living in this untrusted world.” l


FUTURESCOT | WINTER 2018 | 25


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