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WHAT’S ON


Chinese New Year Celebrations


10 February, 2019 Chinese New Year falls on 5 February 2019 and the celebrations take place on the following Sunday. The London celebrations are the largest outside Asia with hundreds of thousands of people taking part.


You could watch the parade which starts on Charing Cross Road and works its way through Chinatown. There is also a family zone in Leicester Square which usually includes some demonstrations and activities for children.


Here are our suggestions for things you could try at home to celebrate Chinese New Year.


Make Chinese Lanterns The lantern is considered a symbol of joy and good luck. All you need is paper (red obviously), scissors and glue. https://www.china- family-adventure.com/ how-to-make-chinese- lanterns.html


Celebrate the pig 2019 is the year of the pig. So let the kids paint their faces, wear pig outfits and generally embrace the year of the pig.


Buy something red Red is considered lucky in Chinese culture. Red packets containing money are given to children during the New Year.


Clean the house Cleaning is thought to get rid of any bad luck from the old year, but make sure you do it before New Year. Sweeping or brushing after New Year could brush away any good luck.


Enjoy Chinese food Fish is thought to represent a surplus, so fish dishes are traditional for New Year. Dumplings are eaten in Northern China. However, getting kids to try anything outside of their normal repertoire is a good idea.


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Say Happy New Year “Happy New Year” in Cantonese is “San Nin Faai Lok” (pronounced san knee fy lock) and in Mandarin is “Xin Nian Kuai Le” (pronounced sing nee-ann koo-why ler). You could also wish others a prosperous New Year by saying “Gong Xi Fa Cai” (pronounced gong she fa tsai) in Mandarin or “Gong Hei Fat Choi” in Cantonese.


For more information on Chinese New Year and the London celebrations see www.lccauk.com


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