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4 • October 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC. Eat Well & Prosper: “KITCHEN BIBLES” T


hree Akkadian tablets contain the fi rst record- ed recipes from 1700


B.C., in ancient Mesopotamia. T e earliest collection of recipes was written in Latin and attributed


to the Ro- man gour- met, Api- cius, in the 1st century A.D.


Half a cen-


tury later, Chinese books on the art of dinning became popular during the Tang Dynasty. One of the earliest to survive was writ- ten by Lang Hu, titled “Important Principles of Food and Drink”. His recipes were adapted from foods eaten throughout the Mongol Em- pire.


by Executive Chef Ron Skaar of Redwing, Mn. ~ ronskaar@comcast.net An abbreviated “Pocket Apicius”


was written in the Carolingian era, which was founded in 751 A.D. T is book is considered the last manifest of the cuisine of Antiqui- ty. New methods and techniques were revealed in early Arabic recipes from the 9th and 10th centuries. T e fi rst


compilation of recipes in Europe began in the late 13th century. Early Medieval recipes were found in a Danish manuscript dating


from 1300,


comprised of texts from a century earlier. Around 1350, “T e Book of Good Food” shows up in Ger- many. Near the end of the century, the Frenchman Guillaume Tirel,


the master chef to two kings, com- piled “T e Provisioner”. A similar Venetian work from the mid-14th century features 135 reci- pes alphabetically ar- ranged. Early cook-


books were only fi t for kings during the 15th and 16th centu- ries. In West- ern Europe, the oldest pub- lished collection emanated from the


palaces of royalty. In the


middle of the 15th century, tech- nology helped broaden the cook- book’s intended audience with the advent of the printing press. By the 1600’s, cooking had progressed to an art form and good chefs were in demand. T e successful ones u


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wrote books on food preparation and, more importantly, how to manage the household. In 1670, a female chef was the fi rst to publish a cookbook in Korea. Victorian preoccupation with


domestic respectability brought a modern form to the writing of cookbooks. Eliza Acton penned “Modern Cookery For Private Families” in 1845. T is very infl u- ential book listed ingredients with cooking times, included the fi rst recipe for Brussels sprouts and re- mained in print until 1914! All cookbooks in the States were British until Amelia


Simmons


published “American Cookery” in 1796. One hundred years lat- er Fannie Farmers “T e Boston School Cook Book” came out, and contained 1,849 recipes. “Kitchen Bibles”, cookbooks that serve as basic culinary references began to appear providing not just recipes, but kitchen technique and pilot- ing the household. “T e Joy of Cooking” or “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” were full of a range of recipes, plus provided ways to embellish every day living. October is national cookbook


month and the perfect time for sa- voring this pumpkin recipe.


October 2018


EW & P Recipe


PUMPKIN PARFAITS


Ingredients:


1 15-oz. can pumpkin purée


1/2 tsp. Pumpkin pie spice 1/8 tsp. Kosher salt 2 cups mascarpone cheese


1 1/4 cups confectioners sugar


1 cup heavy cream 1 cup crushed chocolate wafer cookies (about 4 oz.)


In a medium bowl, using hand mixer, beat the pump- kin purée with pie spice, salt, 1 cup mascarpone and half the confectioners sugar, un- til thick. In another medium bowl, beat the heavy cream with remaking mascarpone and confectioners sugar, until soft peaks form. Spoon half the pumpkin mixture into 6 glasses and top with half of the mascarpone mixture and half the crushed wafers. Re- peat the layering once more. Refrigerate until well chilled, at least 1 hour. Garnish with more wafer crumbs before serving. Serves 6.


Directions:


4 • October 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC.


“May you live every day of your life.” ~ Jonathan Swift


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