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LIVE 24-SEVEN


TURKEY ON A TRAY? ? ? . . . NO THANKS


Is it just me, or does Christmas seem to be getting earlier each year? Clearly I don’t mean that this year it’s going to be on the 20th instead of the 25th, but that these days all things Christmassy seem to be shoved down our throats even before the summer has ended and the kids have gone back to school.


The other day I was having the conversation, or should I say moan, that inevitably occurs at this time of year about how Christmas should be kept firmly in December and not last half the year, cards should only be allowed to be on sale after bonfire night, and any sign that appears outside a restaurant or hotel before the end of September exhorting you to “Book now for Christmas” be taken down and filed somewhere neatly about the owner’s person, when I realised that actually some things do need planning further in advance than others.


For example, if Auntie Maud and Uncle Sid have already announced that they’d love to come for Christmas, along with all the family and usual suspects, there are issues to be addressed. Of course there’s the matter of presents, which if you’re anything like my wife have to be bought and wrapped by March latest, or if you’re like me need careful thought whilst downing Gluwein in the Christmas market on December 22nd.


Then there’s where to sleep them all, an issue easily solved by the kids topping and tailing while the adults utilise inflatable mattresses and sleeping bags – or is it the other way round?


But then we come to the Christmas dinner, and here’s the problem. Things have all changed. We’re all so much busier, the pace of living is so much faster, there’s so much more to get done in so much less time. So we’ve streamlined our lives and got rid of our dining rooms, turning them into home offices or kids’ playrooms, or at the very least left them to gather dust. These days families hardly ever sit down to a meal together, and if they do it’s likely to be on laps in front of the TV, or at best in the now ubiquitous kitchen/diner. Now that’s all very well and possibly even expedient some of the time, but I’m not sure that serving Auntie Maud, Uncle Sid et al with roast turkey and all the trimmings on a TV tray quite hits the mark.


So come on guys, what about it? Let’s re-invent the dining room, and get back to (or begin) getting friends over for good food, good wine and some good old fashioned conversation. Let’s give ourselves the opportunity to slow the pace of life down at least a little, and enjoy the basic pleasures once again of sharing a meal in beautiful and peaceful surroundings, without Phil Mitchell’s monotone drone in the background – by the way, I saw the other day that he’s in Panto in Southampton this year (useless fact number one).


/ 128


John Biddell - John Charles Interiors


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