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the combination of admissions, catering and retail profits, plus memberships (over £400,000pa) pays for day-to-day costs plus some improve- ments. But the need is to raise money for capital projects. The recent re-engineering project cost £9 million in the end, but it does mean Brooklands now has a track record of delivering projects which should help in convincing funders for future opportunities. In 2003 Mike Bannister was working for British


Airways trying to decide from 88 serious applica- tions where the seven now redundant Concordes available for loan would go. Allan explained the rationale for choosing Brooklands; it was where the British end of the Concorde project was run from under Sir George Edwards and where over a third of the plane was built. Additionally, the Museum already had an enviable collection of aircraft representing the history of post-war British civil aviation and Concorde would com- plete that story. Again Brooklands is where it all happened; from Roe’s first flying experiments to production of the largest British passenger airliner – the VC 10, in all 18,900 aeroplanes first flew from Brooklands. It took £1.4 million to get


Concorde ‘Delta Golf’ and the flight simulator to Brooklands and today over 40,000 people a year still take the ½-hour experience. Looking forward Allan is now the first Vice


President of the Museum, a role he describes as being a supporter using many of the relationships he has made in his career to help keeping Brooklands alive. Also in retirement he will rebuild his 3-litre Bentley which cost him £15,500 33 years ago (funded by redundancy from Haymarket) and in which he has driven 100,000 miles. He will also spend more time with the VSCC, which makes motor sport accessible to all, both as a marshal and as a competitor in the Bentley. He will still be allowed to drive the Napier-Railton, “The best corporate perk in the world”. There was far more covered in a fabulous


evening of reminiscences than we have space for here, so if you missed the talk you can hear it on BTM.tv, available on the Brooklands website: https://www.brooklandsmuseum.com/btm/archiv e/btmtv After the discussion a painting by John Whurr


of the Napier-Railton was auctioned for £440. Gareth Tarr


31


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