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healthy kids


O Build a Bento Box


Lunch for Kids Pack Five Foods for Fun,


Flavor and Health by Judith Fertig


30 Minutes Could Save Your Breasts – Even Your Life


Thermography is a 30-minute, state-of-the-art, FDA-registered, painless, touch-free and radiation-free imaging technology. Thermography can help detect abnormalities long before they can be


detected by standard diagnostic tests. Our doctors are Board-Certifi ed in thermal scan analysis. Breast screening includes surrounding areas.


Beacon Thermography is now scheduling appointments at Health Touch, 3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 504, Durham. Call today for an appointment time convenient for you.


“T ermography will become the standard of care for breast health monitoring.”


Dr. Christine Northrup, MD, OB/GYN, internationally known author and authority on women’s health issues “T e option for breast screening that I highly recommend is called thermography.”


Dr. Joseph Mercola, DO, internationally known author, authority on natural health and founder of mercola.com


ld-style rectangular metal lunch- boxes are passé. New, convenient compartmentalized containers


inspired by the Japanese bento box and Indian tiffin allow parents to pack up to five different, colorful and healthy items for a child’s lunch with less plastic wrapping to separate foods. It dovetails exactly with what nutrition professionals recommend.


Tink Five


“People usually eat with their eyes,” says Allison Forajter, a clinical dietitian at Community Hospital, in Munster, Indi- ana. “Te more color and variety present- ed the better.” Holley Grainger, a registered dieti-


tian, creator of the blog Cleverful Living atHolleyGrainger.com and mother of two school-age daughters in Birmingham, Al- abama, agrees, saying, “Tese boxes make lunchbox packing easier because each compartment can be assigned a different food group.” Grainger usually starts with a protein,


adds fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and inserts a surprise treat for a total of five selections. “One easy and inexpensive way to boost protein is through low-fat dairy options like milk, yogurt, string cheese or cottage cheese. For children that like meat and poultry, roasted chicken and low-sodium deli turkey are delicious options. Tis is where I like to work in leſtovers, so last night’s entrée may be the filling for today’s lunchbox mini-tacos. For a high-protein vegetarian/vegan option, beans/legumes are a favorite, whether in dips, salsas, salads or pastas,” she says. Forajter recommends exploring varied


colors of the same type of fruits or vegeta- bles. Offer green and purple grapes or red, yellow, green and orange bell pepper strips, and ask kids if each color tasted different. Including unusual fruits or vegetables can be a learning experience for the whole family. “Try purple and orange cauliflower or red, yellow, white or purple carrots,” she suggests. Grainger not only packs healthy foods for her kids, she makes sure they get a little


910-803-2150 beaconthermography.com


36 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


“emotional nutrition”, as well. She might include a piece of chocolate or a cookie, but the surprise doesn’t have to be food. “A note or picture from you written on your child’s napkin adds a special touch. It lets them know you’re thinking about them and gives them a feeling of security throughout the day,” she says.


Elena Veselova/Shutterstock.com


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