search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
After Plastic New Eco-Packaging Options Underway


Frito-Lay, Campbell Soup and other major U.S. players in the food and beauty industries are talking more about sustainability these days. The result is adoption of innovative materials. Tom Szaky, founder and CEO


of recycler TerraCycle, advises, “Bioplastics are meant to be a solution for the world’s plastic waste problem. However, in most cases, biodegradable bioplastics will only break down in a high-temperature industrial composting facility, not in your average household compost bin. Plus, these are not recyclable. A better solution might be to place the focus on durable bioplastics that are made from plant materials, but can still be recycled,” Entrepreneurs like Daphna


Nissenbaum are taking action. As an Israeli mom, she chided her teenage son for trashing rather than recycling plastic water bottles. Yet then, she says, “I realized plastic bottles weren’t the main issue,” when she saw flexible packaging such as chip bags, candy wrappers and go-to containers crammed into the trash. Nissenbaum learned that most flexible packaging isn’t recycled and ends up in landfills, oceans and other places. Once an orange peel is


discarded, it disintegrates biologically and turns to compost, she saw, and committed to engineering packaging to do the same. A graduate of the Israeli Army’s elite software engineering program and with a marketing MBA, her Tipa Corporation has patented bioplastic that acts like plastic. “When composted, the material naturally breaks down in 180 days or less,” she says. Tipa now makes zippered bags, stand-up pouches and packaging for coffee, snacks and produce.


11 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


Hopeful Sign Animals Gain Some Protection in New Budget


The Humane Society Legislative Fund, the government affairs affiliate of the Humane Society of the U.S., worked with animal protection champions in both chambers and with other stakeholders to secure success on several fronts in the 2018 federal budget. Victories include preventing the slaughter


of wild horses and burros, preserving protections for carnivores on National Park Service lands in Alaska, preserving Endangered Species Act protections for Great Lakes wolves and urging the U.S. Department


of Agriculture (USDA) to restore inspection reports and enforcement records for horse shows, puppy mills, roadside zoos, laboratories and other facilities that were purged from the agency’s website in early 2017. The budget also adds another $2 million for USDA enforcement of the


Animal Welfare Act and $5 million to train and provide therapeutic service dogs for veterans and soldiers. It holds the line against cuts on many other vital fronts affecting animals, such as the Marine Mammal Commission and development of alternatives to live animal testing. Harmful provisions still reflected in the budget include exempting


concentrated animal-feeding operations from reporting toxic air emissions and maintaining a prohibition on the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate toxic lead content in ammunition and fishing tackle that poison and kill wildlife.


6512 Six Forks Road - Suite 404A (1st Floor) Raleigh, NC 27615.


(919) 986 9940 www.Renovonaturalhealth.com


Traditional Naturopathy


Dr. Lonardo specializes in helping individuals with anxiety, depression, mood disorders, postpartum depression & health weight loss.


Dr. Michael Lonardo ( PscD., TND. )


NO DRUGS, Only Natural Protocols, Take Your Life Back!


FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION


Plus get your intake evaluation for $199 (normally $300).


*Offer Subject to change without notice. New Clients Only. Cannot be combined with any other offer.


September 2018


11


Value $49


KhanIM/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40