search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
green living


I


Ways to Make Far Less Trash by Avery Mack


ZERO WASTE LIFESTYLE


A Dental Experience


Like No Other Experience the unique talent and dental artistry of Dr. Valerie Preston, Raleigh’s most trusted dentist. Relax and enjoy comforting spa treatments — Relaxation Without Sedation before your dental appointment:


• A warm blanket • A neck massage • Paraffi n hand wax treatment • Diff used natural essential oils


Benefi t from our state-of-the-art professional dentistry for all ages. Dr. Preston creates beautiful, naturally radiant smiles for the Triangle’s most select and highly-demanding clientele.


Restorative Dentistry • Cosmetic Dentistry Pediatric Dentistry • Invisalign


CALL OR GO ONLINE TODAY TO LEARN MORE


Valerie Preston Dental 8320 Falls of Neuse Rd. Raleigh 919-518-0540 www.vprestondental.com


30 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


n manufacturing, a zero waste policy means designing products so that all resources are used or reused. It’s a concept Bea John- son, author of Zero Waste Home: Te Ultimate Guide to Simpli-


fying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste, embraced for her family a decade ago in Mill Valley, California. “My goal was to simplify our lives,” she says. “We found a zero waste lifestyle isn’t what we expect- ed; it’s better. It’s good for the environment and for our family.” Johnson reports achieving 40 percent savings in annual


household costs. “Voluntary simplicity has also changed our daily routines. Simple living focuses on experiences versus things, and we find we have more free time,” she says. “Our minimalist ward- robes now fit into carry-on bags for travel.”


A Doable Personal Goal “Don’t expect to reach zero. Go for zero-ish,” counsels Celia Ristow, a freelance writer who blogs at Litterless.com. In 2017, Ristow and two friends, Moira Kelley and Bailey Warren, started a grassroots group called Zero Waste Chicago to raise awareness and connect locals with needed resources to reduce trash. “We speak at grocery stores, community events, schools, colleges


and to employees on their lunch hour. We love how responding readers send suggestions and outlets for reusing items,” says Ristow. Local efforts can take off when people find like-minded others


through using hash tags like #zerowastechicago on Instagram, search for a local blogger or host a mini-meet-up in a grocery that sells in bulk or at a coffee shop that uses ceramic cups or no plastic stirrers. Similar grassroots organizations are active in Colorado (EcoCycle.org/home) and Seattle (EcoCollectiveSeattle.com). “Zero waste seems difficult to imagine in the U.S. People


think change is costly and time-consuming,” Johnson says. “My vocation is to shatter these misconceptions. Follow the 5 R’s: refuse what you don’t need, reduce what you need, reuse, recycle and rot. Refuse single-use plastics and junk mail, reduce the volume of clothing items and sports equipment, buy used, recycle the unwanted and compost (rot) food waste, lint, hair and floor sweepings. It’s not that complicated.” Due to her experience, Johnson can now store a year’s


worth of waste in a pint-sized Mason jar. “Inside is deterio- rated foam from headphones, a dental retainer, silicone caulk from the sink, fruit and veggie stickers, clothing labels, plastic mini-bumpers from cabinet corners I replaced with felt and a plastic-coated spike from the dishwasher,” she says. “I’m still amazed when people have a use for something I don’t want or need. Start by saying no to flyers, freebies, party favors, business cards, plastics, excessive packaging and junk mail. Accepting them creates more. Refusing such clutter is the first rule to a less wasteful lifestyle.” Kathryn Kellogg, the Vallejo, California, author of the Going


Zero Waste blog and a content creator for Pela Case, a Canadi- an eco-friendly smartphone case maker, offers many zero waste swaps. “I use silicone cupcake liners instead of paper, bar soap in lieu of plastic-packaged body wash and make my own lip balm.” She also has alternatives for sponges, plastic wrap, cooking pans and toothbrushes. Consider her 31-day challenge at GoingZe-


Elizaveta Galitckaia/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40