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18 184 SHEPHERD’S BUSH ROAD, HAMMERSMITH, LONDON


STEELS


Rather than the 1915 concept of continuing the concrete frame, the new domed extension is in lighter steel frame to allow three storeys


nent use and asked architectural practice Collado Collins to initially make sugges- tions as to what this might be. Hotel and residential uses were consid- ered but discarded and eventually refurbishment as an office was chosen. The building had been built using the then-revolutionary concrete frame technique, but by the time Collado Collins became involved almost 100 years later this frame was showing wear and tear. Other than the structural elements, only a few original features – including mosaic floors and wood panelling – remained on parts of the former ground floor showroom area and a small space thought to have originally been a customer reception area. Collado Collins’ chosen design was for an open plan office space, as having been built as a car showroom, the building has high ceilings and was ideal for conversion into offices.


While the work needed to refurbish the interior would be comparatively straightfor- ward, the problem was how to create enough space to make it attractive to a potential occupier?


Being listed as Grade II major alterations were out of the question, and the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham


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The problem was how to create enough space to make it attractive to a potential occupier


planning authority was concerned about maintaining views and the building’s relationship to its surroundings. Collado Collins lead architect Sanja


Tiedemann explains how the solution lay in the roof: “The roof was flat as in the origi- nal design, but in 1915-16 the building was designed to be five floors high, and even though only three were built the structure could take five floors and two cores popped out above roof surface which would have been for these floors.” She continues: “We put in a 1.5 metre transfer zone. On top we placed the new domed glazed roof, which utilises the exist- ing structure.”


The 1915 version would have continued the concrete frame upwards but the new dome is a steel frame with glass to reduce weight, which meant three floors could be fitted on the original roof beneath the glazed dome.


ADF JANUARY 2018


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