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By the Dart • Dartmouth at Work


rope, but it was only sold once a year. Many of us needed it through- out all the seasons so one of the chaps started to supply me with loads of it and I would sell it to fishermen. The business grew from there. I still go out fishing on my little boat but just for fun.


Do you think the business will still be here in another 50 years?! I hope so - but not with me! I think my children will try and carry it on.


I’ve just turned 80 so I will be bow- ing out soon and retiring to my little house by Paignton harbour. I was born in that house and have lived there ever since.


What have you got left on your bucket list? Not much! I have travelled all over the world - America, the Caribbean, Italy. I’ve got my family all around me. I’ve done pretty much all I want to do.


Which was your favourite place to visit? Venice. I liked the culture, the food, the people and being so close to the water.


What would you do if you won the lottery? Still work here, believe it or not - but I’d have to run it alone as my family would all scarper with their share of the money!!


59


David ‘Sid’ Griffiths


Fisherman


Do you have your own boat? Yes, she’s called Reel Easy and I usu- ally take her out three times a week.


What do you catch? I’m a shell fisherman by trade and for 30 years focused on crabs and lobsters. Now I just use rod and line and at the moment it’s all about sea bass - it’s the trendy fish of choice.


What’s a good day’s fishing for you? I’m happy if I catch a crate and a half of bass, I can get between £250 and £400 a crate.


Where do you sell them? My two main clients are Mitch Tonks for Rockfish and The Seahorse and Nigel Way for The Royal Castle.


Where are the best fish at the moment?


Recently I’ve been going near Lyme Regis. There are several old ship- wrecks there where the bass play.


Do fishermen help each other? We’re a funny breed, we would do anything for each other, a real close knit bunch of men in that way. But we lie through our teeth about where we’ve been all day!


What time do you get up on a fishing day? 3am. I live in Blackawton so by the time I’ve parked and loaded my boat it’s usually around 4am before I’m heading out. I get back around 6pm.


So you must be a morning person? Luckily yes! You get to see the world before most people. I think Dartmouth is at its absolute best


at 4am when the sun is coming up and not much is stirring - except the fishermen.


Is fishing a skill? It really is. Whether it’s nets, pots or rod and line - you have to learn how the fish operate, what they like, where they go and how to outwit them - most of all you have to learn patience. It takes years to master the trade. It’s called fishing not catch- ing, if it were as simple as catching everyone would do it!


Why did you decide to do it - it is, after all, one of the most dangerous jobs in Britain? I don’t think it’s a job really - it’s a calling. Fishermen are passionate about what they do and most can’t stop doing it. I’ve woken up in some beautiful places, I’ve seen sunrises artists dream of painting. I’ve seen


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