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128 POSTCARD from Leonie


View of Voidhokoilia and the lagoon from Palaiokastro Ruins at the ancient site of Olympia A


CRACKING five-hour sail took us from the gracious northern Ionian Sea to wilder southern Ionian waters which flow to the rugged shores of


the Peloponnese. The region is the last southern thrust of mainland


Greece into Mediterranean waters and resembles the palm of a hand with three fingers pointing down and a thumb stuck out to the east. Surrounded by more challenging and fiercer seas, the


Peloponnese are mostly bordered by high mountain ranges which run irregularly from the region’s centre into the sea in all directions. Severe gusts can blow down the


mountain sides and this forbidding physical geography may be why comparatively few yachts venture down this coast. Those that do are rewarded with a hugely varied landscape from white-sand beaches facing azure water, sleepy whitewashed villages, towering rugged mountains, famous ancient classical sites, medieval castles and churches, lush farmland and verdant olive groves, swathes of


barren and remote landscapes and inland gorges with racing white-water


rivers. We travelled 29 nautical miles from


the pretty anchorage of Ormos Keri on Zakinthos island to the cruise ship base of Katakolon, the best place to leave a yacht if you want to visit Olympia (about 25 miles away), which we did.


We avoided the crowds by visiting the ruins when the cruise ships had left port and by catching the first


Kyparissia


Lakka Bay, Paxos


BY GINNY WARE


A loggerhead turtle at Kyparissia


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