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EDUCATION WORKS! Educating children about water safety is fundamental to saving lives at sea and a core part of our prevention work. The more young people we can reach with our water safety messages, the more lives we can save now and in the future. In the South Hams the beach safety


presentations are divided between the RNLI Beach Lifeguards and the RNLI Edu- cation volunteers. The lifeguards usually visit schools in late April, after they have been trained but before they start their beach patrols. The RNLI Dart education team usually visits in the gap after SATS, for the schools that take them and before the May half term. In the past all the Primary schools in Dartmouth, the surrounding villages and Totnes town have been visited; over 500 children in all.


The comment below came into Supporter Care from Nicky Sheppard: “I just wanted to say a big thank you to the RNLI. Through


“they knew not to panic, get their bearings and then swim across the current. They did exactly this and swam to safety”


your education programmes you have ensured my children were safe. One evening last week they both (16 and 11 years old) got caught in a rip current at Bigbury beach. We live near Bigbury and are aware of where the rip is and where it is safe to swim etc. They both were only waist deep in water near the lifeguard station at Bigbury but several big waves suddenly swept them off their feet, out and into the rip; they were nowhere near the usual location of the rip. They both were out of their depth and kept going under the water within seconds. Fortunately, as parents, we have spoken at length


to them about rip currents, water safety and also the RNLI have been into their schools talking to the children so they knew not to panic, get their bearings and then swim across the current. They did exactly this and swam to safety onto the beach. They were both in shock and exhausted. They had to tread water for a long time and waves kept forcing them under the water. They were swept out near to the island but they managed to get to safety! I cannot thank you for all your efforts in schools and with


educating people; it works so please keep it up. It also shows that even when you know a beach really well and swim in a safe area the unexpected can still happen. Thank you again and keep up the good work!” Nicky Sheppard


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