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PROTECTION IN AGGRESSIVE ENVIRONMENTS SPOTLIGHT ON SWEDEN


FEATURE SPONSOR


The Ocean Energy sector needs material protection systems to be able to deal with very hard challenges


Ocean energy devices and components are subject to one of the most aggressive environments. Corrosion, mechanical stress, biofouling and biocorrosion challenge the reliability of materials used.


OCEANIC PROJECT CONSORTIUM Focusing on exposed metallic surfaces the Oceanic project consortium has proposed a composite coating (metal and polymer) working as well against corrosion as against marine biofouling. This is possible by modifying the Thermal Spray Process in order to incorporate a polymeric powder loaded with a new antifouling weapon.


A novel and flexible antifouling concept,


demonstrated for the transport sector in the FP7 EU project LEAF is contact active and thus opens up for novel applications, even when not paint based. This AF Tech is able to protect surfaces against biofouling for years and can works as well in paint as in polymeric materials.


THERMAL SPRAYED ALUMINIUM (TSA)


TSA on the other hand is a well- established technique in the anticorrosion coatings sector. The TSA creates an aluminium foam layer which protects against corrosion. Recent studies have shown that barnacle attachment on TSA coatings, can increase by 10-100 fold the erosion rate of aluminium foam.


To avoid this the main goal of Oceanic coatings is fusing a well-established


technology used on land with an emerging technology from marine material protection science.


Oceanic


TWO MAGAZINES IN ONE!


Rotate the magazine for


Wind Energy Network


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk www.wavetidalenergynetwork.co.uk 39


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