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LIVE24SEVEN // Travel T R AV E L – S E V I L L E


a delightful oasis filled with orange trees, flowers, tranquil pools and the cries of peacocks.


It’s a good idea to pre-book tickets to the Alcazar. It is one of the most popular sites in the city and visits are by timed entry.


As a complete contrast to the historic architecture of the Cathedral and Alcazar, if you find yourself in the shopping area of El Centro, it is worth seeking out the Metropol Parasol. Mr Jones thought this contemporary structure reminiscent of giant waffles in the shape of mushrooms. It is more than just a piece of art however; it’s possible to walk around the top for magnificent views over the city.


A walk out of the centre will take you to the Plaza de Espana, built as the centrepiece for the Expo in 1929. It features a canal crossed by small bridges, winding around a plaza, in front of a semi-circular renaissance style building. 48 alcoves represent all the provinces of Spain, each complete with a tiled map. Whilst the Plaza reminded Mrs Jones of the Venetian in Las Vegas, she loved all the colourful tiles, painted ballustrades and lampposts.


Like much of Spain, Seville has it’s own bull fighting arena, but this wasn’t something the Jones wanted to see. Instead, their Spanish cultural highlight was flamenco. Don’t leave Seville without a taste of this most traditional of Spanish dances.


Mrs and Mr Jones spent their last evening in Seville at the Museo del Baile Flamenco. The museum of flamenco takes you through the origins of this dramatic dance form. It also has its own small theatre for nightly shows. Sangria in hand, they were enthralled and amazed by the passionate performance unfolding before their eyes.


FOOD AND DRINK Seville is the city that claims to have


invented tapas. The traditional way of eating it is standing up, moving from bar to bar. But there are plenty of seats on


offer for tired tourists. Drinks are cheaper than in in the UK. The traditional accompaniment to tapas is a glass of dry fino sherry or beer. But the red wine and sangria are good options too.


The Joneses fell in love with all the tapas on offer. They were quick to learn however, the locals eat later in Seville than they do at home. There doesn’t seem to be much point going out any earlier than around 8.30pm, if you want to find any atmosphere.


As night falls, the tapas bars and restaurants fill with people, spilling out onto the tables and chairs set up on the pavements outside. You might see a band playing outside a bar, or hear the strains of Spanish guitar or rhythmic stamping of feet from a flamenco show.


Mrs and Mr Jones found themselves mainly frequenting the tapas bars along Calle Mateos Gago, one of the roads leading to the Cathedral. Favourite dishes included thin slivers of Iberico ham, croquettes, patatas bravas and bacalao (salt cod) in tomato sauce.


For an authentic tapas experience, head to El Rinconcillo on Calle Gerona. This is Seville’s oldest bar and full of hustle and bustle. It is well known for its jamon, and specialties such as chickpeas and spinach or salt cod in onion sauce.


If you have a sweet tooth, look out for the pastelerias along Calle Sierpes. La Campana is one of the most famous of these and fantastic for ice cream or pastries.


WHERE TO STAY For sightseeing and atmosphere, the Barrio Santa Cruz is the best area to stay in.


There are loads of hotels to choose from, but Mrs & Mr Jones stayed at Hotel Las Casas de la Juderia. This hotel is full of character and located in the old Jewish quarter. It is made up of a collection of 27 houses linked together by plant-lined alleyways and flower filled courtyards – it’s hard not to get lost! Rooms are furnished in a traditional style. During the summer months, a rooftop pool terrace offers lovely views of the surrounding rooftops. The spa provides a lovely place to relax after a busy day of walking around the city.


USEFUL TRAVEL INFORMATION:


British Airways fly five times per week from Gatwick to Seville EasyJet fly daily from Gatwick to Seville Iberia fly daily from Gatwick to Seville


Hotel Las Casas de la Juderia - www.lascasasdelajuderiasevilla.com/en La Campana – www.confiterialacampana.com El Rinconcillo - www.elrinconcillo.es/en Museo del Baile Flamenco - www.museoflamenco.com


Mrs & Mr Jones explored Seville as part of a 6-night self-guided rail journey, The Splendours of Al-Andalus, with Inntravel – www.inntravel.co.uk


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