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LIVE24SEVEN // Property & Interiors GARDENING – WI TH CAMI L LA BAS S E T T - SMI TH


Through The Garden Gate


This June sees a new entry in the botanical calendar. Our media horticulturalist, Camilla Bassett-Smith, pops her RSVP in the post and invites you to join her at the show on everyone’s lips…


It’s here, after so much talk and anticipation! Welcome to the RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, filled with chatter and chlorophyll like never before!


This brand new RHS show taking place from the 7th to the 11th of June, presents itself when borders everywhere are bursting forth and Britain is deadheading and digging in all directions.


The show is partnered by Wedgwood and my mind leaps to their sophisticated luscious green jasperware merging so beautifully with the elegant house and surrounding greenery of the show. I’m particularly fond of their current Tea Garden Lemon & Ginger Mug and of course a whole range of floral glazed fancies.


Wedgwood is of course a perfect choice to work in harmony with the RHS as it is thanks to John Wedgwood, son of the celebrated Josiah Wedgwood, that the RHS was formed. John suggested the idea to one of George III’s head gardeners and the rest is horticultural history.


The Chatsworth Estate in Derbyshire is


the most beautiful of settings and is home to the Cavendish family. I remember well my Grandfather’s memory of the Batsford based Mitford girls, of which the sadly departed Duchess of Devonshire ‘Debo’ was one, prior to her marriage to the man who was to become the 11th Duke of Devonshire. A real character, a strong lady who would no doubt have loved to have joined the jollity of this new social highlight.


Climate change is high up on the show agenda here with the RHS Garden for a Changing Climate offering a look at now and what the future could hold, as visitors learn about the latest RHS report on Gardening in these changing conditions and identify plants suited to adapt to their new environment.


Having worked with him on the creation of the BBC Bristol Wildlife Garden, I’m thrilled to see Gloucestershire boy Paul Hervey-Brookes creating his biggest show garden to date as he celebrates the quarry and all things stone and slate. Sponsored by the Institute of Quarrying to mark 100 years of the industry, planting will waft in a palette of purples and white. It’s becoming increasingly fashionable at shows to recycle gardens and this one will breathe new life at the National Memorial Arboretum following the show. How right it is that after all the work in creating something, it is not lost. Jo Thompson makes use of industrial materials too, as she creates ‘The Brewin Dolphin Garden’ using steel bars and naturalistic planting.


One of my favourite places at the shows is undercover (makes me sound like a horticultural spy!), where colour embraces you like a giant plant filled duvet. The Floral Marquee will take inspiration from Joseph Paxton’s Great Conservatory at Chatsworth, which housed a plethora of exotic flora, palms and aquatic plants. Like


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Camilla Bassett-Smith


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