search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIVE24SEVEN // Business THOUGHT S FOR JUNE 2 0 1 7 Digby Lord


You may feel it is remiss of me, given my natural inclination to comment on major matters political, not to comment on the result of the General Election but, due to an Editor who is to reasonableness what Herod was to baby-sitting...


I am penning this some 35 days before the nation goes to the polls, although you, Dear Reader, will be reading it after a new government and a new parliament have started work. It was Harold Wilson who said, "A week is a long time in politics" so five weeks is an eternity.


I have no intention of giving hostages to fortune, but given two specific performances so far I don't think Ol' Jezza will be asking the home removers to look up the way to Downing Street.


One is the absolute horlicks made of the simple task of setting out some police recruitment numbers and costings by Dianne Abbott on The Nick Ferrari TalkShow on LBC. Breaking news, as I write this, is that she has just declared that the four new Bank Holidays decreed by Jeremy "I just love spending other people's money" Corbyn will be happening on 30th February, 31st June, 32nd October and 25th December!


Jones


The other specific performance is the results of the Local Elections yesterday (I am writing this on the first Friday in May). The hammering taken by Corbyn-led Labour (at the hands of the SNP and the Lib-Dems as well as the Tories) across the UK does not auger well for a party whose four leaders are all based in London with three of them in contiguous constituencies in "Nawf Landon".


However my heart leapt for joy at the news just a couple of hours ago that Andy Street has been elected as the first-ever elected metro-mayor for our region; not in any way because he was the Conservative Party Candidate (regular readers will know that I don't do party politics), but because he was the candidate for non-ideological, business-based, tax-generating, job-creating, internationally-competitive policies needed for tomorrow; he is new, fresh, untrammelled by the seediness of local politics and unfettered by the blind ideology of a bygone age. He gave up a huge, well-paid job and took on a political careerist....risked everything....and won! Marvellous!


Go for it Andy! Go out there and put the ball in the net for God's Own Region! Mr Mayor...I say congratulations and I salute you.


So my analysis of the National Exercise in Democracy will have to wait a month, but one aspect of the psephological practice is worthy of comment and lament right now; it is no-one's business how people vote, but it is the business of all of us that they do vote. Men died on beaches and women threw themselves under horses' hooves so that we can exercise our right secretly to put a cross in a box and try to get a particular brand of politician into power. All I can say is that if you don't bother to vote, you surrender the right to complain about the lot who got in because loads of others did bother.


The turn-out at the West Midlands Mayoral Election was under 30%!! Disgraceful! So over two-thirds of the adult population of (one of) the most important region(s) in the country couldn't be arsed to get down to a Polling Station and salute the memory of men and women (from the Suffragettes over a hundred years ago to Tommy Atkins on D-Day to the authors of the Great Reform Acts of the 19th century).


And we call ourselves a Democracy do we? Lord Digby Jones


Lord Digby Jones was Director-General of the CBI 2000-2006 and Minister of State for UK Trade & Investment 2007-2008. He is involved in many businesses that trade in the EU and around the world.


/ 84


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132