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FEATURE SPONSOR


TRAINING


GREAT EXPERIENCE AND ACHIEVEMENT


Head of Physics at Brentwood Ursuline, Mr Dif said, “This represents a great achievement for the girls who have become role models to their younger peers at school where interest in engineering is growing.” Student Abbie Cook said, “The scheme has been invaluable in both my choice of A level studies, as well as my future career. Winning the EES national competition was truly amazing and the feedback we had from the judges and public was very inspiring.” Fellow student, Alicia Trew also commented, “The EES project has been an amazing experience. Before entering the project, I had an ambition to enter into a career in engineering. After finishing the project as national winner, I am one hundred percent certain that engineering is the career I would like to follow.”


STEM CLUB


Following the project success, the team has gone on to set up their own science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) club at school, helping to inspire younger students and grow their passion for engineering further as they look to pursue their learning at university next year. The ‘Tarminator’ itself has a bright


future and is currently going through a more rigorous product testing and commercialisation process with the view to it becoming a standard piece of equipment on both HMN and Global Marine vessels based across the globe.


Global Marine Systems


IS TRAINING SUFFICIENT TO GUARANTEE COMPETENCE IN THE OFFSHORE RENEWABLE INDUSTRY? EXPERIENCE


The Offshore Renewable Industry has invested time and money in developing, and implementing training programmes, which make sure personnel are trained in safety critical, technical and operational activities. Mr Richard Warburton, Managing


Director for Maritime Training & Competence Solutions (MTCS), asks the question: “But how far do all these training programmes go in making absolutely certain an individual is competent? It can be argued that generic shore based training does help an individual in achieving competence, however it does not necessarily guarantee they are competent in the context of the environment in which they work.


PRESUMPTION SCAN/CLICK


“There is often the presumption that by training an individual they will automatically become competent! Training may include some element of assessment, but this often takes place in a safe, controlled and non-contextual environment. MTCS Competence programmes, firmly established in the oil and gas industry, make sure candidates are assessed in the workplace by trained and qualified, occupationally competent supervisors.”


MORE INFO


MTCS have over 15 years’ experience in working with Offshore Contracting companies to provide robust and fully accredited programmes, with the aim of certifying their personnel are competent in safety critical activities.


A certificate of competence is mandatory in the oil and gas industry for many safety critical activities. Their fully accredited competence schemes provide an effective ‘Risk Management’ tool; whilst ensuring employers are fully meeting their obligations of relevant safety legislation.


ESTABLISHING COMPETENCY REQUIREMENTS


MTCS are now in the process of speaking to the Offshore Renewable Industry to establish their competency requirements. Richard concludes: “We have received a number of positive responses from the industry and we are now inviting organisations to engage further with us, so that we may provide further insight into how our proven, fully accredited, top-class, competence management programmes can be used in managing the construction and operation of offshore windfarms.”


MTCS (UK) Ltd


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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HUMBER UPDATE


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