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TRAINING


FEATURE SPONSOR


PLAN, PRACTICE, APPRAISE AND REPRISE


Why your organisation can never be over-prepared for handling an emergency incident


Can you confidently say that your employees are trained to perform when it matters most? Under the pressure of a live emergency, with a life potentially at risk, will they have the competency and confidence to recall and react as required? The key is to implement a range of business resilience, emergency and contingency planning solutions, incorporating the following measures…


• Review of existing emergency response procedures


• Creation of full written emergency response plans


• Review, testing and updating of those plans and procedures


• Design, implementation, review and testing of associated rescue plans


APPRAISE, REPRISE, PLAN AND PRACTICE


No matter how thorough your planning and risk assessment… “it is the execution of procedures when under extreme pressure which will determine their success”. It is critical to equip all personnel with the cognitive skills to manage an emergency in such a high- risk environment.


Take a detailed look at your existing plans, procedures and training resources…


• Does your training relate to real risks that have been identified at the operating site?


• Does your in-house response team have relevant insight? Have they had first-hand exposure to the scenarios that could be faced?


• Does your training give your team members the opportunity to walk through the events likely to occur in an emergency?


• Do your facilities and equipment enable true familiarisation with a required procedure?


Only through regular and frequent specialist training can an organisation fully prepare its workforce for an emergency.


Humber-based HFR Solutions CIC was established in 2012 to share the skills, values, knowledge and expertise of Humberside Fire and Rescue Service (HFRS) with the commercial sector. Directly aligned with HFRS, they are a leading provider of risk prevention and emergency response.


Experts in emergency planning and testing for the energy and renewables sectors, with a vast experience in providing realistic simulations both on and off site, the company is able to identify all the credible scenarios and complete a Fire Risk Assessment of an offshore wind turbine.


LEADING RENEWABLES AND POWER GENERATION ORGANISATION ENTRUSTS HFR SOLUTIONS CIC WITH EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING


Recently a leading operator from the renewables and power generation sector, approached HFR Solutions CIC to help review their existing emergency procedures, undertaking a series of intensive incident and emergency coordination training initiatives. The tailored training tested their emergency response plans as well as their decision- making processes, when under pressure.


TESTING DECISION-MAKING AND TEAMWORK THROUGH TAILORED PRACTICAL SCENARIOS


Their existing emergency response procedures were reviewed during three practical scenarios. HFR Solutions CIC designed the exercises, in association with the client, based on credible scenarios identified from the risk profile of their operational site based within the Humber region and included…


• Man-overboard at a transition point • Turbine fire affecting workers in the nacelle


• Hub rescue of a live casualty suffering a life-threatening injury


The exercise objectives were to confirm knowledge and understanding


of the training provided, to test this organisation’s emergency response plans and to test the team’s decision-making strategies and approach to teamwork.


FOUR KEY ELEMENTS OF INCIDENT MANAGEMENT


1. Site specific information – this element of the initiative enabled this organisation’s own systems to be incorporated into the course, covering their own emergency response plans and how they are applied to emergency situations


2. Clarity and communication – delegates were introduced to the incident command systems which are used nationally by the emergency services and many companies, looking at how they overlap with the organisation’s own systems. This included the information required for a succinct and specific handover to emergency services or to colleagues relieving personnel from a post and for ensuring essential information is conveyed expediently. For instance, formalised training in radio protocols could help to ensure that critical messages are given priority by use of certain priority phraseology


3. Decision making – balanced decisions are vital at an emergency and to prepare for this, the course covered the decision-making model, considering the risks against the potential benefits


4. Debriefing – the opportunity to reflect on what has been learned about an individual, team and their procedures is an essential process for ongoing refinement and so the organisation received guidance on the rules to adopt during a debrief


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


HUMBER UPDATE


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