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MARKET OPPORTUNITIESFEATURE SPONSOR


BOSTON RENEWABLES – A CASE STUDY


THE DETAIL…


• Customer – Westfield Farm • Existing on electricity site use – 400,000 kWh P/A


• Renewable generation – 300,000 kWh P/A


• Reduction in grid supplied electricity – 60%


• Tonnes of CO2 saved – 163T P/A THE CHALLENGE


Recent years have seen an increasing demand from food processors and consumers for ethically sourced food produce. Kingsmill Bakers advertise that they are ‘Slicing Emissions’ and other food processors have similar tag lines. And so the challenge at Westfield was for the business to demonstrate a reduced energy overhead and carbon footprint.


THE SOLUTION


Boston Renewables are a division of the Bostonair Group, and provide a number of renewable and low-carbon energy solutions to the commercial sector in the Yorkshire and Humber region such as solar PV arrays, wind turbines, energy storage, voltage optimisation, solar car ports and electric vehicle charging.


CASE STUDY


Westfield Farm forms part of a modern, mixed farming enterprise. The business produces in excess of 17,000 pork and bacon pigs per year for the UK’s food industry, as well as wheat, barley and oilseeds for both the UK and continental markets.


CUSTOMER TESTIMONIAL


“The installation went very smoothly and to timetable and we are now seeing the benefits of reduced energy costs for our business.” Denis Lockwood, Finance Director – on behalf of Pitwherry Ltd


SCAN/CLICK


Having successfully won a Planning Appeal against National Air Traffic Services, Boston Renewables installed two 80kW Endurance E3120 wind turbines at Westfield Farm. The turbines were installed under Ofgem’s capacity extension system to ensure the maximum benefit from the Feed In Tariff scheme, one in October 2014 and the second in March 2015. The majority of the annual generation of circa 300,000kWh of green electricity is used on site to power automatic livestock feeding and ventilation systems. The wind turbines were installed with the assistance of Boston Energy technicians.


Boston Renewables


THE HUMBER RENEWABLES AWARDS


The most important date on the Humber region’s clean power calendar


The Humber Renewables Awards hosted by the Hull Daily Mail is returning for a sixth year and will recognise success across nine categories, honouring firms large and small for doing their bit to make this area a fulcrum of green energy. This annual event is to recognise and celebrate the great strides being taken across the Humber region in the renewables industry. For companies ranging from small start-ups to large corporations in the sector, the awards are an opportunity to highlight good practice, innovation and enterprise.


BEST OF THE BEST


With prizes up for grabs for educators, builders and innovators, the competition promises to reward the best of the best, with the celebration taking place at The Deep, Hull on Thursday, March 9, 2017. Hosted by ITV Weather presenter, Emma Jesson who will be accompanied by a top speaker, the dinner will gather together industry leaders and experts from across the region and beyond providing excellent networking opportunities.


SPONSOR – SIEMENS


The awards event is again being sponsored by Siemens, which is developing a £310m offshore wind hub at Alexandra Dock, Hull. Jason Speedy is the Director of the energy giant’s turbine blade factory, which is due to mark the production of the first blade, wholly manufactured at the new facility, next month.


INVESTMENT MORE INFO


Jason stated: “Our investment in Hull is one of Siemens’ largest anywhere in the world and is the city’s biggest ever inward investment. We’re here because Hull is perfectly positioned in close proximity to the huge offshore windfarms in the North Sea.


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


HUMBER UPDATE


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