This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LOGISTICS


FEATURE SPONSOR


WHEN IS A WIND TURBINE NOT A WIND TURBINE? WHEN IT’S A PIECE OF CARGO


McAusland & Turner explain the reasoning… Albert Weatherill


plan for a vessel. In one extreme example we found that the actually height of towers was greater than the depth of the tween deck of the vessel! Not an ideal situation if you can’t close the hatch covers.


LIFTING AND STORAGE


We also find that the absence of the marking of centre of gravities cause enormous problems when lifting large, heavy items like nacelles. The positioning of the lifting equipment is critical to avoid unexpected lateral movements particularly if a vessel has developed a partial list and the sea fastenings have not been removed completely. With regards to storage we often find that the lay-down areas for components do not meet the recommended guidelines of the manufacturers. This can cause delays and slows progress with discharge operations.


ALLEVIATING PROBLEMS


This is not as silly a statement as it may at first appear. We conduct many warranty inspections on WTG components both in the UK and overseas and regularly come across the same problems time and again. WTG components leave their places of manufacture as components. Whilst that is correct when they arrive at the side of the vessel they need to be viewed as just another piece of project cargo. Unfortunately, components often arrive with incorrect measurements declared, centres of gravity not marked and


sometimes with gaps in the advice given to all parties involved in their carriage and storage.


WIND TURBINE TOWERS


As an example wind towers are usually declared as per their greatest diameter however, for the purposes of carriage and stowage they are fitted with a supporting frame. This obviously adds height to the piece which may not have been accounted for when drawing up a stowage


In order to help alleviate these problems, manufacturers and underwriters need to involve surveyors earlier than is currently the norm in order that likely issues with cargo can be addressed. At the end of the day ships are ships and cargo is cargo. Applying proper practices of good seamanship with advanced product knowledge will help to minimise damages and delays when shipping WTG components.


McAusland & Turner


112


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


HUMBER UPDATE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116