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Recycling Revolution Global Rise Bolsters Sustainability


On November 15, thousands of events in communities nationwide will celebrate America Recycles Day (AmericaRecyclesDay.org). A program run by national non- profit Keep America Beauti- ful since 2006, the event is dedicated to promoting recycling in the U.S. via special material collection drives and edu- cational activities. Materials available to groups include advice on set- ting up collectibles stations and customizable templates for promoting activities to increase recycling awareness, com- mitment and local action. There’s plenty of room to grow: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the amount of waste that the average citizen composts or recycles has increased from 17 percent in 1990 to 33 percent today. Some other countries have been conducting their own


national programs longer. For the 19th year, Australia will celebrate a weeklong National Recycling Week (Recycling- Week.PlanetArk.org) in November. More than 90 percent of Aussies feel it’s the right thing to do. Recycle Now (RecycleNow.com), England’s national


program, supported and funded by the government and implemented by 90 percent of municipalities, conducts its annual weeklong program in June. Organizers contend that six out of 10 citizens now describe themselves as committed recyclers, compared to fewer than half when the campaign launched in 2004. Germany also celebrates recycling for two days in June; many other countries do so in July.


Monsanto Pushback More Countries Ban Toxic Roundup


Countries are gradually banning the use of Mon- santo Roundup herbicide around the world as a danger to the environ- ment and human health, and Bermuda is one of the latest to join the ranks. These moves come soon after a recently published metastudy conducted by the World Health Organi- zation International Agen- cy for Research on Cancer published in The Lancet Oncology determined that glyphosate, the main ingredient in Roundup, is probably carcinogenic to humans. Colombia stopped using Roundup to kill illegal coca


plants. France banned the sale to homeowners, and Ger- many is poised to do the same. A group of 30,000 Argentine physicians are calling for a ban there, where it’s blamed for boosting birth defects and cancer. Others, including the Brazilian federal prosecutor, are demanding that Roundup’s active ingredient, glyphosate, be pulled off the shelves. In the U.S., the Institute for Responsible Technology


(IRT) is assisting efforts in cities, counties and school systems to enact immediate bans of glyphosate-based sprays. IRT is also calling for schools to measure the amount of glyphosate residues in school meals and to take steps to eliminate them if found.


Source: EcoWatch


natural awakenings November 2015


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