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Accepted claim: Carb-electrolyte solutions help maintain endurance performance


and leading to products being taken off the shelves or made harder to buy.


The good news But there is some cause for optimism: Carey says the sports nutrition industry has fared better than most, with its claims doing well in comparison to those of other food sectors. For example, all claims for probiotic


products have been rejected. Meanwhile, most claims for vitamin and mineral products have been approved, as well as the benefits of protein, creatine and carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions. What has been proven, and what


• Products containing protein contribute to growth and the


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• Creatine increases physical performance in successive bursts of


maintenance of muscle mass.


• Carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions contribute to the maintenance of


short-term, high-intensity exercise.


endurance performance during prolonged endurance exercise, and enhance the absorption of water during physical exercise. Furthermore, there is some hope


that the legislation might be relaxed in the future, as EFSA takes on board the particular requirements of sports nutrition. “Policy-makers and other stakeholders have recognised some of the challenges around sports food, and in the next few years the European Commission is due to prepare a report


gyms can happily say to their customers, is as follows:


assessing sports nutrition regulation,” says Carey. “We hope this will clarify some of the regulatory challenges faced by the sports nutrition industry, and ESSNA is actively engaged on that front.” In the meantime, in the UK at least,


the legislation will not immediately be aggressively enforced, as a short settling-in period has been permitted, provided businesses show they are undertaking steps to comply. However, some EU countries have already started enforcement. Manufacturers may have to change their packaging, and going forward their relationships with clubs – offering clubs advice on how to sell and offer product samples – will become even more important. Gym staff certainly shouldn’t be put off


selling nutritional products to customers, but they will need to inform themselves of the facts (see information box below). It will also be more important than ever


for staff to understand the product and the goals of the client. Lynn Clay, technical education manager at Maxinutrition, advises: “Get to know members and provide genuine recommendations that will support their results and offer solutions, rather than trying to sell them a particular promotion.” Gym goers should also be encouraged


to do their own research and talk to people who use the supplements: good products speak for themselves, and those using them can still be used as unofficial advocates, as the new legislation doesn’t cover non- commercial communication. ●


FOR MORE INFORMATION To delve deeper into this subject, take a look at:


• The EU Register: http://ec.europa.eu/nuhclaims • Department of Health Guidance documents https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/nutrition-and-health-claims-guidance-to-compliance-with- regulation-ec-1924-2006-on-nutrition-and-health-claims-made-on-foods


https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nutrition-and-health-claims-guidance-to-compliance-with-regulation-ec-1924-2006-on-nutrition-and-health-claims-made-on-foods 64 June 2013 © Cybertrek 2013


NUTRITION


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