This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
RESISTANCE EQUIPMENT


THE RESISTANCE MOVEMENT


With today’s buzzwords being free weights, functional and bodyweight training, how is the resistance offering at the gym evolving – and is there still a place for fixed resistance kit? Julie Fisher asks a panel of suppliers for their thoughts


EASE OF USE AND EDUCATION


Miles Rimell, marketing director EMEA & APAC, Precor


At Precor, we believe fi xed resistance machines still command a place on the gym fl oor. Indeed, according to IHRSA’s Profi les of Success 2011 report – which looks at


member participation by equipment and group exercise category – 2.1 million members use resistance machines annually. I think the important issue is not whether they are here to stay, but how we enable those new to exercise to use them, as well as improving the offering for more experienced users.


A key benefi t of conventional strength training is how it adapts to meet the user’s level of fi tness and encourages proper technique, which reduces injuries. But it has to be easy to use, and educating the user is paramount.


When we developed the Precor Discovery Series Selectorised Line, we observed people using their smartphones and took inspiration from consumer products. We focused on taking the intimidation away from strength equipment, making it inviting and approachable, while still providing an improved experience for serious strength exercisers. That meant incorporating easy to understand graphics and, if members are still unsure about a piece of equipment, there are Quick Response (QR) codes that enable them to use their smartphones to view instruction videos.


Precor Discovery Series: QR codes offer access to instruction videos


NEW THINKING Allan Collins, director of education, Jordan Fitness


The traditional view has always been that resistance training is used for strength and bodybuilding, while CV machines are used for aerobic fi tness and fat loss.


However, the concept of


Free weights can also be used by those wanting aerobic gains


resistance training has changed over the last few years – it’s no longer just about strength training – with a paradigm shift in the use of free weights as functional training has evolved. Now trainers understand that it’s more about movement, with the


36 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


end result in fact subject to the training parameters used: free weights can be used for aerobic gains, for example, just as a treadmill can.


Describing exercise in terms of resistance training or CV training is an outdated concept. Kettlebells are a great example of how free weights are now an accepted method for strength endurance, body composition changes (fat loss) and even cardiovascular improvements, as well as an alternative to CV machines.


March 2013 © Cybertrek 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84