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£4 for adults and £2 for children. Meet at Higher Grimpstonleigh Farm, East Allington TQ9 7QH at 2.30pm.


Keen photographers can take


part in a photography workshop at Agatha Christie’s former holiday home, Greenway, on the banks of the River Dart on Tuesday September 25th


. Learn top


photography tips from local experts in the photogenic setting of the National Trust’s Greenway house and woodland garden estate before enjoying a delicious lunch of home- made soup and a roll. Complete your day with an exclusive tour of Greenway House and to top it off, your favourite shot from the day can be entered into a competition with the winning photograph appearing on the National Trust English Riviera website – and the winning snapper awarded an exclusive mystery prize. Bring your own camera and wear sensible, weather appropriate clothing. The six-hour workshop costs £17.50. Booking is essential. To reserve a place phone 01803 842383.


Take a walk back through time on the small South Devon Ash Tree Farm, near Dartmouth, to look back over the last 5,000 years. Stevie Rogers of Ash Tree Farm will be leading the walk on Sunday September 30th


. Using


historical records collected and evidence in the fields, he will explore the historical changes in the landscape from the farm’s early Bronze Age settlement to the modern day. Refreshments will be available. The event, which takes place from 2.30pm to 4.30pm, is £4 for children and £2 for adults. Booking is preferred by phoning 01803 712437 or emailing stevie@ashtreefarm.com.


As September draws to an end, enjoy a two mile circular walk from Kingsbridge to West Alvington Woods. Stroll out of Kingsbridge for a tranquil dawdle


29


through parkland meadow and dappled woodland, just a hop, skip and a jump from the town – an unexpected delight. Looking into the creek from the Quay at Kingsbridge at the start of the walk you can see seaweeds flourishing. This is a rarity as such a variety of seaweeds seldom survive so far upriver. They can only thrive here as the estuary is not fed by any major river and so the water remains very salty even at the head of the creek. If you are lucky you may spot the buzzard which is often seen circling above the parkland meadow by West Alvington Wood. The biggest of our common birds


of prey, it is a majestic sight sailing the thermals on its broad, ‘fingered’ wings. Buzzards hunt rabbits, small rodents and birds, but they’re not above picking around in the fields for earthworms too, particularly in the winter. West Alvington Wood is a wonderful little pocket of old woodland. Its trees are mostly oak, beech and sweet chestnut. Below these taller trees grow many- stemmed, silvery barked hazel. The walk starts at Quay Street Car Park, Kingsbridge. For more infor- mation visit www.southdevonaonb. org.uk.•


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