This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
y rights, August should be spent outdoors. But the Dartmouth Flavel Centre is screening a film about the Second World War evacuation of communities around Slapton Sands on August 16th


. In


November 1943, 3,000 people received the shattering news they were to be evacuated from their homes within six weeks. They had to leave before Christmas and take all their possessions and livestock with them. Slapton Sands was to be used as a practice landing beach by American troops and it would not be safe for people to remain in their homes. What the locals didn’t know was the train- ing was in preparation for D Day, which would herald the end of the war.


Featuring rare footage made available by the Dartmouth Museum, old photographs from the Blackawton and Strete History Group and new interviews filmed in recent months, this gripping story of what it means to leave everything behind promises to be memorable. To book visit www.theflavel.org.uk.


Watch the boats come in at Brixham Harbour on Friday August 17th


20 things to do.... B


on August 18th when a day long


celebration of all that is good in Start Bay is taking place. The event will showcase local arts and crafts, local food and drink, wildlife activities, workshops, talks, shopping and entertainment. With a full programme of both outdoor


SUMMER IN THE BEAUTIFUL SOUTH HAMS IS NEVER DULL, AS COME RAIN OR SHINE, THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW TO EXPERIENCE AND DISCOVER.


Slapton Ley Nature Reserve Celebrate Start Bay


and indoor activities, the event has something for all the family. The celebrations will take place from 12 noon until 5pm. For more information phone Slapton Ley Field Centre on 01548 581529 or visit www.field-studies-council.org/ slaptonley.


Enjoy a walk taking in Bolt


Tail and Burleigh Dolts, which follows in the steps of our forefathers, taking in the spectacular sites of two enclosures dating back


. Get up early and see


the day’s catch being auctioned off at Brixham Fish Market with Rick Smith of Brixham Trawler Agents. Enjoy a hot breakfast as the sun comes up at the Fisherman’s Mission. The fish market tour costs £7.50 for adults and £5.50 for children. Booking is essential and can be done by phoning 01803 861384.


Visit Slapton, where the wartime evacuation took place, for yourself


Brixham Fish Market


The Blackdown Rings above the village of Loddiswell has been fortified since prehistory. Join Paul Rainbird on Sunday August 19th


to


explore the Iron Age fort and the medieval castle while enjoying the spectacular views. Walking boots or stout shoes will be required and


to the Iron Age, as well as the pathways and ancient green lanes in between including a glorious stretch of coast. Standing on the site at Burleigh Dolts, it is not easy to make out the banks and ditches of the Iron Age earthwork that once stood here. It is easy though to see why this spot was chosen as the views over the over the surrounding landscape are commanding – and if this enclosure was ever threatened it would have been impossible to approach in stealth. It is believed Burleigh Dolts may have been used by the Dumnonii tribe. This group occupied much of the West Country, including all of Devon and Cornwall and were a fairly anarchic tribe. They did not use money, were quite scattered and decentralised, and were known for their friendliness to strangers. Start the 3 mile circular walk at Marlborough Village Hall Car Park. For more information visit www. southdevonaonb.org.uk


Compass plinth and castle earthworks at Blackdown Rings


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148