This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Chief Diversity Officer, OfficeMax SPECIAL REPORT


MAKING STRIDES IN DIVERSITY


Carolynn Brooks C


sity Leadership, I am not an engineer; I have had the opportunity to spend my en- tire career around and working with engi- neers; that’s the anomaly of getting an engi- neering degree. Fortunately the engineering people understand that it takes more than engineers for things to go well.” Fortner holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Law and a Ju- rist Doctors degree from Golden West Uni- versity and has completed Raytheon’s Business Leadership Program.


arolynn Brooks currently serves as Vice President, Chief Diversity Of- ficer for OfficeMax. In this role, she is responsible for OfficeMax’s strategic di- rection for all initiatives designed to cre- ate a diverse workforce and promote inclusive practices to achieve the com- pany’s strategic business


imperatives.


Ms. Brooks has responsibility for Work- force Diversity, Supplier Diversity, EEO/ AAP and Community Affairs. She is chairman of the OfficeMax Diversity Council and President of the OfficeMax Charitable Foundation.


dent at Baltimore Polytech Institute (a high school whose curriculum focuses on math and sciences); he won an internship at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Cen- ter. He graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and is a member of the National Society of Black Engi- neers. . Brooks was been a participant of INROADS, Inc and a Graduate Engineer Minority Fellow and actively supports various community organizations in an ef- fort to increase awareness and bring ex- citement to math and science for minority youth. Tavon Brooks enjoys traveling with his wife Mikhal Andrea Brook. The Black EOE Journal congratulates


Raytheon and these recipients for their hard work and dedication in the STEM fields.


Ms. Brooks joined OfficeMax in 2001 in human resources and helped drive the integration of the merger and consolidation of OfficeMax and Boise Cascade. In 2006, Ms. Brooks was pro- moted to Vice President and Chief Di- versity Officer to create a culture of inclusion and a dynamic work environment that promotes diverse perspectives and solutions to help our customers do their best work. Under her leadership, the OfficeMax Diversity Council oversees the strategic plans, metrics and practices that make diversity and inclusion a business imperative.


Ms. Brooks also led in the creation and launch of OfficeMax Associate Re- source Groups in 2008. These associate led-groups were developed to help Office- Max promote broader associate understanding and appreciation of diverse experi- ences and perspectives. She also oversees OfficeMax’s community outreach to ensure that the company expands into the communities where we do business through our associate volunteer program and community outreach efforts. In 2011, Ms. Brooks was recognized by Black Enterprise as a top executive in


Diversity. She was also profiled in the Diversity Business Journal as a 2011 Execu- tive Woman Worth Watching. In 2010, Ms Brooks received National Diversity Council’s award as one of Illinois’ Most Powerful and Influential Women. In 2009, Ms. Brooks was awarded the Diversity Officer Leadership Award by Diversity in Best Practices in Washington, DC for her focus and innovative work to grow and strengthen outstanding diversity and inclusion programs. Ms. Brooks attended Howard University and is a Board member for the Chicago Metropolitan YWCA and a Board of Director on the Board of National Hispanic Corporate Council (NHCC). She is a former member of Du Page County Work- force Board and the Board of Exceed Financial Credit Union. Ms Brooks is a sought-after public speaker and her personal passion is writing


and seeking ways to use her social capital to make a difference. She is married and has three adult sons and three granddaughters. She and her husband Jimmie make their home in the Chicago area.


The Black E.O.E. Journal


www.blackeoejournal.com


95


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100