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Supplier Diversity


employs more than 206,000 people in 70 locations worldwide, and spent $413 mil- lion with Asian, Black, Hispanic and Na- tive American suppliers in 2010. UTC has been a member of NMSDC


for 31 years. In 1976, UTC was a found- ing member of the Connecticut affiliate, now the Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council. Current- ly, UTC participates with 17 of NMSDC’s local affiliates. Jeffrey Place, director of global


supply management, serves on


NMSDC’s Board. Executive leadership and UTC’s Sup-


plier Diversity Council drive strategy de- velopment and work together with supply management and other functional areas to ensure the execution of key initiatives. In addition, their minority supplier develop- ment activities include mentoring, schol- arships for NMSDC’s Advanced Manage- ment Education Program, and continuous improvement training and events. For nine years, UTC has sponsored a Diverse Busi- ness Exchange, bringing together current and future minority suppliers with supply management executives from UTC and its business units, and UTC first tier suppli- ers. UTC has a Second Tier program with $64 million in MBE spend in 2009. David W. Morgan is the founder and


chief executive officer of D.W. Morgan Company, Inc., in Pleasanton, California. Morgan helps the world’s top manufactur- ers deliver responsive solutions for their fast-moving, global supply chains. The company had annual sales of $132 million in 2010 and has 185 employees. D.W. Morgan is a recognized innovator in the supply chain and logistics industry. Mr. Morgan has been named a “Supply Chain Provider Pro to Know” numerous times by Supply and Demand Chain Executive magazine.


Since founding D.W. Morgan Compa-


ny in 1990, Mr. Morgan has built one of the nation’s fastest-growing supply con- sulting, logistics and transportation man- agement firms by emphasizing superior customer service and cutting-edge tech- nology. Mr. Morgan built a first-of-its- kind network of asset-based transporta- tion and logistics operations focused on key global manufacturing locations. To- day, Morgan’s client list includes AT&T,


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Chevron, Cisco Systems, Ericsson, IBM, Kaiser Permanente and Life Technologies. The company provides critical, high-visi- bility and high-coordination services in other locations from Texas to Thailand, San Jose to Shanghai, Guadalajara, Ma- laysia and more. D. W. Morgan holds a Corporate Plus® designation from the NMSDC – a testa- ment to its ability to handle national con- tracts. The company has participated in business missions with NMSDC to Aus- tralia and China as part of its International Program. D. W. Morgan utilizes other NMSDC-certified companies such as Aeronet Logistics, ICE Safety Solutions, Inproma, Mosaic Global Transportation and Zones. J. Leslie Prystup is the chief executive


officer of Prystup Packaging Products in Livingston, Alabama. The Native Ameri- can company provides labels, point-of- purchase advertising materials, and a range of cardboard cartons for packaging dry food, consumer goods and electronic products. The client list for Prystup Pack- aging includes General Mills, Kraft Foods, PepsiCo, Procter & Gamble and Schrieber Foods. The company has had NMSDC Corporate Plus® designation since 1998. Prystup Packaging Products has 152 employees and recorded sales of more than $28.1 million in 2010. In 2010, Prystup worked with a total of 26 minori- ty vendors. Mr. Prystup began his career with the Container Corporation of America, where he worked for 11 years. He rose through the ranks from the production line, through supervision and management, to reach the highest level—president and chief executive officer at Mebane Packag- ing in North Carolina. Although he briefly considered retirement in 1979, by June 1980, Mr. Prystup was forming his own company in Livingston, Alabama. At that time, Prystup Packaging Products was in- corporated in Sumter County, Alabama, near many of the South’s leading paper mills. Despite the challenges of start-up and recessions, this company has com- pleted its third phase of expansion. After 30 years in the business, Mr. Prystup re- mains active and cites his ability to start a capital-intensive, highly-automated busi-


www.blackeoejournal.com


Earvin “Magic” Johnson served as the emcee for the event.


ness in a rural area as his greatest profes- sional accomplishment.


About NMSDC Providing a direct link between corpo-


rate America and minority-owned busi- nesses is the primary objective of the Na- tional Minority Supplier Development Council, one of the country’s leading business membership organizations. It was chartered in 1972 to provide increased procurement and business opportunities for minority businesses of all sizes. The NMSDC Network includes a na- tional office in New York and 37 Regional Councils across the country. There are 3,500 corporate members throughout the network, including America’s top public- ly-owned, privately-owned and foreign- owned companies as well as universities, hospitals and other buying institutions. The Regional Councils certify and match more than 16,000 Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American businesses with member corporations that want to pur- chase their goods and services. For more information about NMSDC, call (212) 944-2430 or visit the Web site at www.nmsdc.org.


The Black E.O.E. Journal


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