This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
AAMC and ADEA collaborate on the


Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), formerly known as the Minority Medical Education Program. This program provides a free, six-week academic enrichment program for fresh- men and sophomore college students. From 2006 to 2009, 3,833 students par- ticipated and to date, 267 SMDEP alumni are enrolled in medical school and 121 in dental school. Many other programs exist throughout


the United States to promote diversity in the health professions. For more informa- tion and additional resources, see the Di- versity Matters section on ExploreHealth- Careers.


Why Diversity Matters


A diverse body of students in health professions schools today will ensure a stronger and more diverse health work- force tomorrow. ADEA’s Dr. Sinkford says, “Diversity does matter and is evolv- ing. It is a passion and commitment and involves revising your thinking and the energy you have to put into the various


“The fact that the nation’s health professions have not kept pace with changing demographics may be an even greater cause of disparities in health access and outcomes than the persistent lack of health insurance for tens of millions of Americans.”


initiatives.” Dr. Marc Nivet, AAMC’s Chief Diversity Officer, adds, “This is a defining moment for health and wellness in America. The combined forces of health reform, demographic shifts, con- tinued economic woes and the projected worsening of physician shortages portend major upheaval for the health care enter- prise in the near future.” What can future health care profes-


sionals do to advance diversity and inclu- sion? Dr. Nivet says, “I would encourage all


future health professionals to read at least two newspapers a day—one should be from their local community, because most


change begins small but we often over- look how multiple small acts of positive effort can influence transformative change. Specific to diversity and inclu- sion efforts, they should always speak up and act whenever they see inequity in any form.” Dr. Sinkford agrees and adds: “Major outcomes have come out of the Sullivan Commission report. And there is still work to do among individuals, orga- nizations, accrediting bodies, and the health professions. We are creating bench- marks along the way to measure success and progress – but progress won’t occur unless everyone is involved in our work- force challenges.”


Takeda has worked diligently to earn its reputation as a team of professionals doing important work that helps people live better lives. We know the key to our success is hiring, developing and retaining talented, devoted employees.


we are driven to improve lives The Black E.O.E. Journal www.blackeoejournal.com


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