This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TRAINING


Industry specific training from the National Fluid Power Centre


THE NATIONAL FLUID POWER CENTRE (UK) TAKES A LEAD IN RENEWABLE ENERGY TRAININGWITH AN EMPHASIS ONWIND TURBINE TECHNOLOGY.


With the assistance of its industrial advisory body (members of the British Fluid Power Association) the NFPC has installed the hydraulic control system, lubrication and filtration system appertaining to a typical wind turbine installation (inshore and offshore).


The NFPC places great emphasis upon the development of real world skills and competency. They believe that this only comes through hands on experience on the actual system components supported by effective training from experienced staff.


They also acknowledge the importance of renewable energy and the need to have a well trained workforce to meet the challenge. The National Fluid Power Centre with its vast practical resource and support from its industrial advisory body will continue to educate and train our present and future wind turbine engineers.


KEEPING IN TOUCHWITH THE GRIMSBY INSTITUTE


WILLIAM DAVIES REPORTS... ON A COLD AND FROSTY MORNING!


Here in Grimsby, like most of the country, there has been plenty of snow and ice for the whole of December in the run up to Christmas. On the 21st of December the Royal Dock in Grimsby was frozen over. This amazing formation of sea ice in the dock has not occurred in over 40 years. The sea ice also formed out at Spurn Point, the entrance to the Humber, and the Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) crew needed to break the ice on the way to the Severn Class “Pride of the Humber” lifeboat.


This rare event of the sea freezing over needs two weather features; firstly a long period of very cold weather and secondly no wind. The wind blowing over the sea keeps it moving and so sea ice does not tend to form in windy conditions. This period of still weather is not good for generating wind energy and it highlights the need for a range of renewable solutions to provide our energy needs.


This range of renewable energy technologies and systems are all covered within the Renewable Energy module within the MSc in Productivity and Innovation at the Grimsby Institute. The masters course is run over two sites, both at the Humber Seafood Institute on Europarc and the Engineering Department on Nuns Corner.


At the moment our current group are finalising this academic year’s projects and we will be looking to feature some of these exciting and pertinent research projects in future training updates.


As the local area is waiting with anticipation of OEM`s (Original Equipment Manufacturer) locating in the Humber it is worth reviewing one of the important aspects that OEM`s require which is a skilled and experienced workforce.


The various essential core skills are in great demand for the manufacture of the larger turbines and infrastructure associated with the Round 3 offshore sites.


James Dobbin being given instructions on the operation, control and setting up procedures on the wind turbine system by Graham Sanders, NFPC Systems Training Engineer and Project Manager for Renewable Energy Training at the Centre.


The National Fluid Power Centre www.nfpc.co.uk


Solar is also at a much lower capacity during the short hours of daylight in the British winter. This is where other technologies both onshore and marine play their part in the diversifying energy supply.


Two such examples found in the Humber area are Bio-ethanol production in Immingham and within the Humber Estuary there are two tidal prototypes currently being tested.


The Grimsby Institute has many potential opportunities for individuals who are looking to up skill and train within our dynamic Engineering department... so don’t be apprehensive in getting in touch.


The Grimsby Institute www.grimsby.ac.uk


Wind Energy NETWORK


43


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92