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SIEMENS TRAINING CENTRE


PERSPECTIVES


The training centre manager: STEVE GREEN Steve Green made a life-changing career switch from a banking job in the City of London moving across to the training sector. He now manages all technical and safety training delivery, including marine sea survival and helicopter underwater escape training for the country’s largest wind power company. Since becoming Training Manager Steve has already built a specialist teaching team that provides technical and safety courses to Siemens’ wind turbine technicians across the UK and Europe. He thinks that this is a fantastic time to be part of the growing and forward-looking wind power sector.


The technical training instructor: MARK CHAMPNEY Mark spent seven years in the Royal Engineers, including time towards the end of his army career as Training Regiment Instructor teaching and training new recruits. Mark now trains technicians in turbine safety, turbine construction and turbine blade tension and is also learning to become an instructor in basic electric and hydraulic principles.


Working onsite at offshore wind farms, offers certain parallels for services leavers entering the wind power industry. Mark has travelled to Siemens’ sites across Scotland, Ireland and Denmark, where technicians are often required to work away from home for long spells and in a tight knit team responsible for each other’s safety. Mark sees similairties between the team and safety culture in Siemens and the one he experienced in his previous life, “there is a real sense of mutual dependency and appreciation of the importance of best practice in all procedures, but especially safety,” Mark says. He adds that “few other jobs outside of the armed forces could offer this sense of adventure.”


The graduate: FEICHIN MCCORMACK Feichin McCormack is part of the new generation of Wind Power Service Engineers set to change the future of energy generation. With no two days the same, Feichin travels across the country to Siemens onshore and offshore Wind Farms supporting some of the 400 wind turbine technicians in the annual servicing of some of Siemens’ 7,000 wind turbines.


For Feichin the training he received at the school was key to enabling him to do his work safely and correctly. While no two days are the same, Feichin’s recent work has taken him to Scotland’s Whitelee Wind Farm, the largest onshore wind farm in Europe, home to 140 wind turbines generating enough kinetic energy to power 200,000 homes.


Feichin’s work is always varied and satisfying, from loading the service van at the start of the day with the correct tools and equipment, to work within the nacelle, through to completing service reports.


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Wind Energy NETWORK


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