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ONSHORE PLANNING


The return to Ripon coincided with the British Steel project at Redcar where David was tasked with commissioning of all the IT work which involved process management and also carried out for ICI at that time.


He then found himself managing marketing and sales through two offices (one in Geneva and one in Reading) in sixteen countries for the Digital Electronics Company (now part of Hewlett Packard).


David said he got a bit fed up of having to travel and so set up CCS2000 closer to home.


WIND TURBINES


David’s company is involved in micro energy generation where the turbines do not require gearboxes. He explaines “This has a number of advantages, 1 no loss of energy driving the gearbox and 2, reliability is better as there is no gearbox to fail.


We use straight through drives with very tight control of the turbine which will probably run at 200 rpm rather than 50 rpm with a conventional gearbox. If the windings are done correctly in the alternator the energy efficiency is much greater.”


YOUR VIEW ON THE INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE?


“We need a more uniform standard for all sorts of situations throughout the country particularly in planning and operation of small wind projects and that is what I would like to see as soon as possible. On a more positive note I believe it will happen........... because it has to.” David concluded.


We could not agree more!


TEAC (The Alternative Energy Company) www.taec.co.uk


TOM CURTIN FROM CURTIN & CO GIVES HIS THOUGHTS ON THE RECENTLY PUBLISHED LOCALISM BILL


Tom is the author of a book on community relations “Managing Green Issues” and the Chief Executive of Curtin&Co, political liaison and community relations specialists.


LOCAL PLANNING REFORM


Councils and communities will receive greater control over their local plans with the Planning Inspectorate being weakened in its ability to re-write local plans. Authorities will only be able to adopt plans judged ‘sound’ by the inspector, but this new measure means that inspectors will only be able to suggest changes, not impose them.


COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE LEVY


Local authorities will need to allocate a proportion of Community Infrastructure Levy (in essence the old Section 106) revenue back to the neighborhood from which it was raised. The Council will also have the ability to set its own levels of levies justified by local need and evidence.


PREDETERMINATION


LOCALISM – BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND


The Planning system is undergoing the biggest upheaval since the introduction of the Town and Country Planning Act in 1947.


The Localism Bill published in December is set to become law – probably in the next 18 months. It will force developers of onshore renewable energy projects to work in a totally different way.


Some key changes proposed are: NEIGHBOURHOOD PLANNING


These will enable communities to permit development - in full or in outline - without the need for planning applications. It will be for communities to identify suitable land, sources of finance and secure support for their proposals.


The rules around predetermination are to be relaxed. Councillors will be free to campaign, to express views on issues and to vote on those matters, without fear of being unjustly accused of having a closed mind on a particular issue because of it. Planning is specifically used as an example, what is not clear is if the relaxation will apply to members of the planning committee.


For developers of renewables, these changes (and these are only a few from a 400 page document), will mean a different way of working. Whereas, in the past community consultation was often seen as a ‘tick box’ activity by some, now it will rule.


With a weakened Planning Inspectorate – the final Bill may say that an Inspector’s decisions are not binding, the only option is to get the community on board from Day 1.


But then that is what I have always advocated.


Curtin & Co www.curtinandco.com


Wind Energy NETWORK


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