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INDUSTRY NEWS


When installing a wind turbine, a delay of more than a few days between monopile installation, transition piece placement and grouting operations can be costly as marine growth and other surface debris can often quickly appear on the monopile surface. As surface cleanliness of the pile is critical for effective grouting, all loose debris and marine growth needs to be removed quickly and effectively to prevent any costly grout removal after installation.


IT’S ALL ABOUT YOU! - CONTINUED


ENERGISING THE FUTURE INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO SUPPORT THE RENEWABLE ENERGY SECTOR


The generation of electricity by harnessing offshore wind power has developed rapidly over the last few years. As the renewable energy sector continues to grow, more offshore based wind turbines are being installed to meet the growing demands for wind energy.


Owner operators and installation companies are therefore continuing to look at new ways of improving efficiencies and reducing maintenance lifecycle costs using new innovative solutions and technologies.


This was the challenge set to Proserv Offshore’s Aberdeen facility, who responded to a request from MPI, a world leader in offshore wind turbine installation who own and operate some of the largest purpose built wind turbine installations and assembly jack up ships in the offshore renewable energy sector. Pile cleaning using a diving team is time consuming and costly so they required a solution that was fast, effective, reliable and with ease of deployment and recovery. Furthermore, they specified that the solution require minimal human intervention and could also be adjustable for a range of different pile diameters.


Taking all the pre-requisites into account, Proserv Offshore designed, developed, manufactured and tested a Marine Growth Removal “MGR” tool. This specialised solution is deployed from a support vessel and located directly upon the open pile.


Once the carriage has completed a full rotation around the track, the support fabrication is lowered to the next position and the surface preparation process is repeated in the opposite direction.


This process continues until all the transition area has been prepared to the required standard. Once complete, the rotations are ceased and the lowered fabrication is pulled back up the pile to its secured transport position within the top located fixture.


The whole tool can then be lifted and placed back onto the deck of the support vessel ready for the next pile deployment.


Using the Marine Growth Removal tool, a pile of 4.7 meters in diameter can be completely prepared to a depth of 8 meters in less than 2 hours. Considering it would take a diving team over 30 hours to achieve the same result, this is a significant time saving for our customers.


The functions of the tool including the circular track speed, jet rotation and jet pressure are all fully adjustable and controlled by the operator on board the deployment vessel. The hydraulic power, high pressure water and electrical power to the observation camera system are supplied via an umbilical. All support equipment including the high pressure, high volume jetting pump is located on the support vessel.


The Marine Growth Removal tool has already been supplied to three major industry leading contractors within the European offshore renewable energy sector, producing excellent results every time.


Proserv Offshore www.proserv-offshore.com


The surface of the pile is then prepared by lowering a hydraulically controlled cleaning sub frame down the pile; utilising high pressure water jets mounted on a track, a full 360 ° by 450mm wide path is cleaned around the pile.


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Wind Energy NETWORK


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