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NFFO


COMMERCIAL NEEDS


In 1984 the NFFO established a commercial division – NFFO Services Limited.


NFFO HISTORY


The NFFO was established in 1977 during the negotiations for the 1983 Common Fisheries Policy agreement. The paramount importance of being able to speak with a single industry voice has remained the defining feature of the NFFO’s existence.


Initially, the NFFO was formed and centred on the North East of England, with a few outposts on theWest coast and South coast. Gradually the NFFO’s membership was extended to cover the whole of the English,Welsh and Northern Ireland coasts, in addition to the Channel Isles.


The initial need for a commercial arm arose from discussions with offshore developers who appreciated that the Federation had a vital role to play during the growing development of UK oil/gas fields in the early 1980’s.


Due to the wide and sometimes conflicting views that exist within the fishing industry, offshore developers quickly identified significant benefits from using NFFO experience and knowledge to overcome what were very sensitive issues of displacement, damage to gear and loss of access.


NFFO Services Ltd opened a route through which offshore developers could offset any loss of earnings by fishermen affected or displaced by their work to provide services such as Guard Vessels and offshore & onshore fisheries liaison, comfortable in the knowledge that appropriate certification, professional experience and insurances were in place.


The NFFO’s delivery of services to an International portfolio of clients is based on a proven track record combined with a blend of knowledge, experience and skills in this particular field. This important dual role within the NFFO has been instrumental in securing mutual co- existence with other offshore industries and has set important cross-industry standards.


The success of this effective cross industry arrangement has stood the test of time for more than 25 years.


An important change to the Federation’s structure was agreed in 1996, when the fish producer organisations, in addition to local fishermen’s associations, were taken into the heart of the NFFO.


The forefront of all Federation involvement with Government Departments, European legislative bodies and all offshore stakeholders is to nurture a collaborative approach to decision making at all levels and give the Fishing Industry it’s knowledgeable voice in the offshore stakeholders arena.


NFFO IS PRO-ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS........


• Europeche (European Association of Fishermen’s Organisation)


• The Advisory Committee for Fisheries and Aquaculture


• Regional Advisory Councils • Marine Stakeholders Advisory Groups • Fishing Industry Safety Group • Individual offshore project consultations


• Fisheries Offshore Oil consultative Group – FOOCG


• Fisheries Liaison, Offshore Wind and Wave – FLOWW


• United Kingdom Cable Protection Committee – UKCPC


• Fisheries Legacy Trust – FLTC


It was a pleasure to visit both Alan and Dave and experience their passion for their industry. It was fairly obvious that all that is required is for us all to communicate in a better way, as well as work together for the benefit of the industry as a whole.


There is so much we can learn from the fishing industry. A profession that has lived with the dangers of the sea for so long and it would seem rather naive not to learn from them – we already know how important transferable skills are and will be in the wind energy industry.


We aim to keep everyone informed of NFFO’s progress in helping the industry as time moves on and major projects develop.


The National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations www.nffo.org.uk


Wind Energy NETWORK


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