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BRAZILIAN NEWS


Partnership shares fastener knowledge By Sérgio Milatias, editor, Revista do Parafuso, www.revistadoparafuso.com


Automakers and other users of fasteners in Brazil are sharing knowledge through a partnership. G A


rupo Parafusagem Brasil has been active in Brazil since 2009, a partnership between manufacturers, systems and other fastener users in search of improvements and technical solutions through the


sharing of knowledge. The group, initiated by Dirley Ottoni de Oliveira, an engineer at PSA Peugeot Citroen, has the support and involvement of other automakers and their management. The first meeting was held in Indaiatuba, São Paulo, organised


by PSA Peugeot Citroen. The second was in June 2010 in Sao Jose dos Pinhais, organised by Renault Brazil. Today, the initiative includes 29 individuals, from Renault,


Scania, Embraer, Iveco, Fiat Power Train, PSA Peugeot Citroen, VW Trucks, Mercedes Trucks, Stola, Takata Petri and John Deere. According to Ottoni: “After the creation and implementation of


meetings, we improved the knowledge of the technologies used in each company. In addition, networking between equipment and process engineering suppliers has evolved and is offering new


applications and technologies among the participants.” Objectives of the group include ways to optimise technical


synergies between automakers, expanding the knowledge of different providers, and emphasise the advantages of connectivity to share knowledge. The aim is to make the meetings a chance to exchange experiences and to expand technical understanding between companies. The intention is to continue to expand membership to other manufacturers and gain approval of the group with ANFAVEA, the Brazilian Association of Vehicle Manufacturers, and to be members of the MERCOSUR carmakers organisation. “Importantly, we respect the confidentiality guidelines of each company, and the accession of the other automakers will be of fundamental importance for the evolution of the group,” concluded Ottoni. The 2011 meeting took place in the summer, working with VW Trucks and Stola do Brazil.


New industrial policy facilitates manufacturing equipment investment


A new Brazilian industrial policy, provisionally labelled the Competitiveness Development Policy (CDP), will contain four initiatives to make the purchase of machinery and equipment easier.


ccording to development minister, Fernando Pimentel, the initiative is “a vitamin injection in the vein of industry, which has been suffering from the overvalued exchange rate and unfair competition from imported products.” The four actions are: the immediate recovery of Brazilian purchase taxes paid by those who purchase production equipment (currently this takes 12 months), accelerated depreciation of equipment from five years to 12 months; the


exemption of international taxes for the purchase of machinery and allowing manufacturers of machinery to buy inputs without paying Brazilian purchase or international taxes.“With the cheap dollar and tax relief, we have the opportunity to make a huge modernisation of the industrial park,” said Pimentel. A wider range of measures are intended to encourage innovation and strengthen trade defence but, as yet, there is no consensus among the ministries participating in developing the new industrial policy.


J


ose Gianesi Sobrinho is president of SINPA, the Brazilian Fastener Industry Association. SINPA has 51


fastener manufacturers as full members and links with more than 450 companies in the state of São Paulo associated with the fastener industry. SINPA plays a key role in representing the interests of the Brazilian fastener manufacturing


sector with government bodies and other sectors in the fastener production chain. In the June/July issue of Revista do Parafuso Gianesi speaks in detail about the issues facing the Brazilian fastener industry, including a domestic steel market dominated by two major suppliers; why some fastener manufacturers in Brazil also have to act as importers; the need for the automotive sector to increase its sourcing of domestically manufactured fasteners and other government initiatives that could support SINPA members.


Sacma presents first workshop in Brazil


Sacma Limbiate, together with Ingramatic and Carbodies, presented its first educational workshop in Brazil in May, at the Holiday Inn Hotel, São Paulo.


T 40 Fastener + Fixing Magazine • Issue 71 September 2011


opics included the ease of operation and efficiency of the Italian heading machinery particularly for production of complex parts; the flexibility of Ingramatic thread rolling equipment, including in


SEMS assembly; and some new perspectives on forging. The event was coordinated by Carlos Camargo and


Douglas Camargo, directors of Sacma Brazil, supported by Sacma’s Latin American commercial director, Luca Romanò and Paolo Redaelli, director of Carbodies Srl, producer of high precision carbide tools for cold forging.


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