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proportion” of the total domestic production. In addition, it pointed out that, by limiting the domestic industry defi nition to those producers willing to be part of the sample, the EU excluded producers that might have provided relevant information. This introduced a material risk of distorting the determination of injury. Lawyers supporting the Chinese case interpret this fi nding as meaning that the EU will, in


principle, have to re-defi ne the domestic industry in the fasteners investigation. Depending on how the EU does this there could be implications for the injury analysis. The Appellate Body also considered that the EU acted inconsistently with its obligations by


failing to provide timely information about the product types used in determining the normal value. In principle the EU would appear to need to disclose this information, which could provide Chinese exporters the opportunity to claim adjustments based on it. Potentially, this is seen as resulting in adjustments to the comparison between export price and normal value, which could in turn require the determination of new dumping margins. The Appellate Body did, however, uphold a WTO Panel fi nding considering that the EU was


correct in keeping the identity of complainants confi dential. Disclosure of this information would, arguably, have made EU companies reticent to make future complaints to the Commission over alleged dumping. The Appellate Body also reversed a Panel fi nding and ruled that the EU had been correct in keeping information from the analogue country producer confi dential. The WTO published a summary of its key fi ndings, a copy of which can be downloaded from:


http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news11_e/397abr_e.htm In conclusion the Appellate Body recommended “that the DSB (Dispute Settlement Body)


request the European Union to bring its measures, found in this Report and in the Panel Report as modifi ed by this Report, to be inconsistent with the Anti-Dumping Agreement and the WTO Agreement, into conformity with its obligations under those Agreements.”


Grainger purchases Fabory


BBI customer can now quote and operate buying account in Euros including invoicing and payments


US industrial maintenance and safety products supplier W.W. Grainger Inc has announced plans to buy Fabory Group for approximately 242 million euros. The transaction was completed at the end of August.


supplier network will help accelerate further growth of Fabory’s business.” Fabory Masters in Fasteners, formerly known as Borstlap & Sons, was founded in 1947 by


J


BRIGHTON-BEST INTERNATIONAL


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J.M. Borstlap and his sons Karel and Joop. In 2004 ABN Amro Capital acquired the group from the Borstlap family. In 2007 AAC sold it to HgCapital for 345 million euros having reportedly made a substantial return on its investment. Fabory sales in 2010 were approximately 211 million euros. The Group employs 1,600 people


and is headquartered in Tilburg, the Netherlands. In Europe there is a chain of Fabory centres, in addition to the headquarters and central warehouse in Tilburg, and a warehouse in the Czech Republic servicing eastern European branches. The Group operates in USA and Canada, and in China. Fabory supplies some 80,000 product lines, servicing120,000 customers in 110 locations. Grainger intends for Fabory to continue as a separate business under its own name and


brand with Oswald van der Belt, who was appointed in 2008, continuing as CEO. He will report to Court Carruthers, senior vice president and president, Grainger International. Grainger is headquartered in Lake Forest, Illinois. 2010 sales were US$7.2 billion servicing


businesses and institutions in 157 countries from a 700,000 line range, of which fasteners is said to be a small percentage. It employs 18,500 people and has 600 branches, more than two thirds in the USA. Grainger is expanding in both Asia and Latin America, operating in Mexico, India, Columbia, China, Japan, Puerto Rico and Panama.


12 Fastener + Fixing Magazine • Issue 71 September 2011


im Ryan, Grainger chairman, president and chief executive offi cer said: “Fabory provides a unique opportunity for Grainger to enter one of the world’s largest MRO markets through an established and growing business.” He added: “Fabory brings expertise as a fastener specialist to amplify Grainger’s product offering, while Grainger’s scale and


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