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NEWS


Retrospective duty demands hitting importers


Following the publication of the Malaysian circumvention ruling, European fastener importers are receiving notifi cation from customs authorities of their liabilities to pay 85% anti-dumping duties backdated to the beginning of the investigation.


E uropean Council Regulation 723/2011, published in the EU Offi cial Journal on 26th July


2011, confi rmed the application of 85% anti-dumping duties on imports of certain steel fasteners from Malaysia, except from eight exporters, which were granted exemptions. The Regulation entered force on 27th


July 2011, applying the 85% tariff to imports


of the steel fastener range defi ned in the original investigation against China. The Regulation defi nes a Taric additional code for each of the eight exempted exporters:


Exempted Exporter


Acku Metal Industries (M) Sdn. Bhd Chin Well Fasteners Company Sdn. Bhd Jinfast Industries Sdn. Bhd


Power Steel and Electroplating Sdn. Bhd Sofasco Industries (M) Sdn. Bhd


Tigges Fastener Technology (M) Sdn. Bhd TI Metal Forgings Sdn. Bhd United Bolt and Nut Sdn. Bhd


Taric Code B123


B124 B125 B126 B127 B128 B129 B130


Exemptions are conditional on presentation to customs authorities of a valid commercial


invoice, conforming to requirements set out in the Annex of the regulation. If this is not done the full 85% duty will be applied. The Regulation also confi rms that the duty will apply to imports registered by EU member


Stainless Steel A2 & A4


Hexagon Head Nuts


Washers


state customs authorities since the start of the circumvention investigation in October 2010. Importers are now receiving notifi cation of this liability from national customs authorities, against which they have 30 days to lodge an appeal. The retrospective imposition of duty is causing considerable anger amongst importers. While few are willing to be quoted directly, several have told this magazine they consider this action as wholly unjust. Most argue that they carried out the best assessment they could to ensure a factory was genuinely producing in Malaysia before ordering. Some suspended orders immediately the investigation was announced but were unable to stop shipment of product already manufactured or containers already on the water. Several also complain about lack of transparency from the Commission, which provides no public explanation of why a specifi c factory failed to obtain an exemption. One UK importer said: “Not only are we now facing a 50,000 euro duty bill, which we could do absolutely nothing to avoid, we will also have to pay 20% VAT on the additional duty.” The full text of the Regulation can be downloaded from the EU Offi cial Journal, Page L194 26.07.11


Hazardous substance regulation updated


On 1st


BRIGHTON-BEST INTERNATIONAL


+ 4 4 ( 0 ) 1 3 8 4 - 5 6 8 1 4 4 www. b r i g h t o n BEST. o r g


T July the European Parliament and Council published


Directive 2011/65/EU on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment.


he regulation, referred to as RoHS2, updates and replaces the original RoHS legislation (Directive 2002/95/EU published in 2003). EU member states are required to bring its provisions into national law by January 2013. The new regulation will bring into force a number of requirements that will directly


affect suppliers to the electronics/electrical products market. In particular it strengthens the requirements on the electronics supply chain to ensure compliance and widens the scope to eventually cover products with any level of electrical function. Fastener + Fixing Magazine will consider the implications for fastener suppliers in our


next issue. 14 Fastener + Fixing Magazine • Issue 71 September 2011


Arrived


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