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BEST PRACTICES BLOOD


The offi cial US Lacrosse policy regarding the handling of blood/bleeding situations during games is as follows.


When a player suffers a laceration or wound where oozing or bleeding occurs, the game should be stopped, and the player should be given appropriate medical treatment. The player may return to the game with the approval of medical personnel (team doctor, trainer, or other designated person with medical training). She may re-enter the game in the same half.


If the offi cial stops the game because a player is bleeding, the player must leave the game and a substitute may enter. If the offi cial stops the game because an injury has occurred, the regular injury time out procedure is followed. If an injury time out has been called because of a bleeding problem, the player must leave the game, even if medical personnel/coach have not come onto the fi eld. A substitute must enter.


In cases where a goalkeeper is bleeding, and is the only dressed goalkeeper, the game should be stopped. Then, the goalkeeper should be given appropriate medical treatment, and she may remain in the game.


If there is blood on any part of a player’s uniform or personal equipment, medical personnel should determine whether it has soaked through the uniform to the player’s skin or is capable of being transferred to another player and a change is required. In the absence of medical personnel, the offi cial(s) will make this determination. A uniform is considered saturated when blood can’t be removed. The same criteria should be applied to a player’s personal equipment (stick, gloves, knee brace, etc.). If a uniform shirt is changed, the player’s new number must be recorded in the scorebook before she re-enters the game.


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GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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