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MAJOR FOULS STICK CONTACT


WHAT IS IT? Stick checking is an attempt to dislodge the ball from an


opponent’s stick by using controlled stick-to-stick contact. To keep the game safe, rules are in place to control the players’ sticks. Stick-to-body contact is


prohibited. FUNDAMENTALS


CONTROL Checks must be under control and never toward an opponent’s head or body.


PATIENCE Good defensive body positioning can cause the ball carrier to drop ball or expose stick to check.


DEVELOPMENTAL U9 - NO STICK CHECKING! U11 - NO STICK CHECKING!


U13 - Modifi ed checking below the shoulders in downward motion away from the body


U15 - Same as U13 unless offi ciated by two USL offi cials (at least one must have Local rating), then full checking allowed


STICK UP Defensive players should hold sticks up to “mirror” the ball carrier’s


stick in order to block passes and shots.


MODIFIED CHECKING Allows a downward motion away from the body when the ball carrier’s entire stick is below her shoulders.


PLAY SAFE


Sticks are hard and can cause serious injury if used in an uncontrolled manner.


Checks must be outside the 7-inch “sphere” surrounding head and away from the body.


No player’s stick may hit or cause her opponent’s stick to hit the opponent’s body.


Players should only check using the sidewall of the head of the stick.


Rough and reckless checking can cause injury and warrants a yellow or red card.


58


If contact is made with a stick that is held in a horizontal position, the foul shall be on the player who’s stick is in that horizontal position.


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


WHEN an opponent has the ball WHERE anywhere on the fi eld WHO player defending the ball-carrier


WHY to regain possession of the ball by checking the ball loose


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