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PENALTY ADMIN FOULS


WHAT IS IT? When a foul occurs, the offi cial will blow the whistle and all


players must stand while the offi cial gives the call and repositions players


as necessary.


WHEN anywhere an infraction occurs WHERE on and around the fi eld


WHO the offi cial directs all players and coaches involved WHY to keep the game safe and fun


FUNDAMENTALS


MINOR FOULS Fouls that give an unfair advantage. The offending player will stand 4 meters away in the direction from which she approached.


MAJOR FOULS Fouls that are dangerous. The offending player will stand 4 meters behind the player awarded possession.


DEVELOPMENTAL


No shooting on 8-meter free positions unless using a goalkeeper or modifi ed goal.


Teach defenders to quickly mark opponents when inside the 8m arc to avoid 3-second fouls. (defender cannot remain in the 8m arc unless marking an opponent within a stick’s length)


Violations should be identifi ed in practice. Explain why they happened and how to avoid them.


56


THE THROW In the event of offsetting fouls, a throw (similar to a


jump-ball in basketball) is taken.


FOUR METERS No player or her stick is allowed within 4 meters of the player awarded possession.


PLAY SAFE


A yellow card is given as a warning to an offending player, coach, or team personnel. The player must leave the fi eld for two minutes and the team must play short a player below the restraining lines on each end of the fi eld. (U9/U11 allows a substitute to enter the game for the carded player).


A red card is an ejection from the game. Anyone receiving a red card must leave the fi eld for four minutes and is prohibited from playing in the team’s next game.


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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