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OFFICIALS GAME MISCONDUCT


US Lacrosse works closely with game offi cials to ensure youth lacrosse is safe for all players as well as fun and informative. To that end, youth games should be called closely with dangerous fouls and misconduct addressed immediately. The penalty for misconduct is the same as a major foul. In addition to a free position being awarded, time will be stopped and a yellow or red card will be issued. The offending player will need to serve penalty time in the penalty area with no substitute. (U9/ U11 allows for a substitute to enter the game.) A player getting a red card means immediate ejection and suspension from team’s next game. Misconduct fouls are:


Excessively rough, dangerous, or unsportsmanlike play. Persistent or fl agrant violation of the rules. Deliberately endangering the safety of an opposing player.


Baiting or taunting which is intended or designed to embarrass, ridicule, or demean others. Excessive dissent or abusive language.


Non-playing team member leaving their team bench area during the game. Coach leaving their coaching area.


Re-entering the game before yellow card or green/red card penalty time has elapsed.


Any type of behavior which in the offi cial’s opinion amounts to misconduct.


2015 POINT OF EMPHASIS FOR COACHES, PLAYERS AND OFFICIALS: Sportsmanship - There is concern that increasing incidents of unsportsmanlike behavior on and off the fi eld are putting the foundations of girls’ lacrosse at risk. The beauty of this sport comes from girls working together to achieve a skilled, strategic competition between teams while respecting each other, the offi cials, the coaches and the rules. The committee encourages coaches, players and offi cials to work together to preserve the spirit of girls’ lacrosse. Positive and sportsmanlike conduct by all is necessary for the integrity of the game.


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OFFICIALS GAME MISCONDUCT


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