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MAJOR FOULS BODY CONTACT


WHAT IS IT? Girls’ lacrosse is a non-contact sport although incidental


body-to-body contact may occur.


WHEN during the course of the game WHERE all over the fi eld WHO all players


WHY players compete for the ball and/or positioning to get an advantage


FUNDAMENTALS


ANTICIPATION By anticipating where the ball will go, players can adjust their position relative to others.


AWARENESS Players should be


aware of the location of themselves and other players.


DEVELOPMENTAL


It is essential to enforce rules at practice to ensure consistency and safety for players.


Young athletes need to practice agility and footwork in order to learn proper positioning.


2015 POINT OF EMPHASIS FOR


COACHES, PLAYERS AND OFFICIALS: Offensive Fouls - Offensive players gain an unfair advantage when they force through, cradle in the sphere, set illegal picks, shoot or propel dangerously, follow through in an uncontrolled or unsafe manner, and/or fail to control their bodies after a shot. Offi cials need to be particularly vigilant to see the attack player fouls and enforce all fouls equally and fairly. Offi cials should review the particulars of attack fouls that may be found in the rulebook and offi cials’ manual.


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SAFETY Any overly aggressive or uncontrolled contact is unsafe and dangerous.


HUSTLE The fi rst player to the ball has a better chance of establishing


position and gaining possession. PLAY SAFE


Incidental contact may occur when two players are going for a loose ball.


Legally boxing out or sealing off an opponent is an important part of winning possession off the draw and on ground balls.


If a player overruns a ground ball, she may not back into an opponent to shield the ball, nor cover the ball with the back of her stick, preventing another player from gaining access to that ball.


Body-to-body contact may be called charging, blocking, pushing, or no call at all if it’s clearly incidental.


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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