This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ROLES OFFICIALS


WHAT IS IT? Offi cials ensure that the game is played safely,


fairly, and in accordance with the procedures recommended in the rulebook. At least two US Lacrosse- trained offi cials should offi ciate a


game. FUNDAMENTALS


KNOWLEDGE Offi cials must clearly understand, apply and explain the rules of the game.


IMPARTIAL An offi cial’s calls will not give unfair advantage to either team.


DEVELOPMENTAL U9 - At least one USL-rated offi cial


U11 - At least one USL-rated offi cial U13 - Two USL-rated offi cials


U15 - Two USL-rated offi cials; one MUST have a Local rating or higher. This is a mandatory requirement for full checking games


Beginning January 1, 2017, the game must be offi ciated by at least two US Lacrosse rated offi cials.


USL CERTIFIED Offi cials must successfully complete US Lacrosse certifi cation and training annually.


SAFETY The rules of lacrosse are in place to maintain player safety, and calls made by offi cials advocate safety.


PLAY SAFE


When two or more offi cials offi ciate a game, they work as a team to make the best calls.


Offi cials work to ensure the game runs smoothly without delay and that play is safe and fun.


An offi cial’s hand signals indicate the calls being made. (See pages 66-76)


All players must immediately stand or stop moving on offi cial’s whistle.


Players must respond immediately to the offi cial’s repositioning and directions.


Offi cials should explain calls to players whenever possible


36


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK USLacrosse.org/OEP


WHEN 30 minutes before game and until they leave the venue


WHERE at the playing venue WHO US Lacrosse offi cials


WHY to enforce the rules fairly, safely and consistently


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100