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ROLES COACH


WHAT IS IT? The coach is a responsible adult role model whose


job is to empower young athletes. The coach should teach kids how to play women’s lacrosse, teamwork, sportsmanship and the many life lessons the sport has to offer.


FUNDAMENTALS


POSITIVE A coach must use positive reinforcement to build player confi dence.


FUN Stress that winning is secondary to enjoying the game.


DEVELOPMENTAL


U9 - One coach is allowed on the fi eld for the purpose of coaching, but may not interfere with the fl ow of the game and or enter the critical scoring area


U11/U13/U15 - Coaches permitted from their side of the substitution area to their end line


All levels, a maximum of 3 coaches allowed in the designated coaching area


SAFETY Players’ safety is the number one priority.


COMMUNICATION A coach must communicate clearly with parents, players, and offi cials.


RESPONSIBILITIES


Meet with offi cial(s), captains and opposing head coach prior to start of game. Certify to offi cials that all equipment is legal under the rules. Confi rm length of halftime.


Indicate a substitute for an injured or suspended player.


Approach offi cial respectfully during pre-game, halftime, or timeouts for clarifi cations.


Request timeouts from offi cial.


Coach should always approach practices with a clear and age- appropriate plan.


Coaches should ensure equal playing time. 30


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK USLacrosse.org/CEP


WHEN during practices and games WHERE at practices and games


WHO an adult who knows the game, is enthusiastic and is ideally an US Lacrosse CEP-certifi ed coach.


WHY to teach the game and make it safe and fun for all involved


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