This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A 16.5-lb. rib roast is shown on the cooker.


Goldens’ has created a logo for the cooker and a separate website to promote the product. The site has an FAQ, blog and even a list of recipes.


that we had a good working product we tooled it up and began our mar- keting efforts,” Boyd said.


iron both as a structural material and as a cookware material,” Boyd said. “It seemed like a perfect fit to us.” Cast iron cookware has been popu-


lar for generations. It cooks evenly, holds heat well and lasts forever, mak- ing it ideal for use. When the finished product was


released to the market in January 2016 after a little more than a year of development, Goldens’ confidence that a cast kamado grill could be achieved was rewarded. “We did a prototype and once we satisfied ourselves after prototyping that we had addressed the issues and


“We saw elimination of steel bands holding ceramic shells and the lack of durability as being two of the primary deficiencies that we can take


advantage of, so we engineered toward eliminating those user pain points.”—George Boyd Jr.


20 | MODERN CASTING February 2017


Facing the Issues Two separate and very different


problems faced the cast iron grill: Weight management and


entrance into a different market sector.


Cast iron has many strengths and


admirable qualities, but low weight isn’t one of them. For all the hopes Goldens’ had for its new cooker, they would be rendered moot if the product wasn’t light enough. It also would not live up to their hopes if it were light, but not durable. “One of the biggest hurdles


that we faced was how do you deal with the fact that cast iron is not only durable but it’s dense, so it’s a heavy product,” Boyd said. “We had to engineer both our hinge design and our wall thicknesses and make the appropriate deci- sions so that you had something that gave you all the durability you needed, and was as strong as a tank but not as heavy as a tank. We had to find that balance.” After testing and development,


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