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LongwoodCenterForHealing.com


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Let nature be your teacher.


Body Care Products Learn how to make your own! Sat, April 9 • 10 am


Flower Essences


10-week journey to emotional health Begins April 4


Medicine Cabinet Join us for a day of fun, learning & medicine making. Take home remedies for your own medicine cabinet and fi rst aid kit


Sat, April 23 Space is Limited! Sign Up Today at


HolisticLivingSchool.org Visit our Website and Video Blog to learn more about Florida’s Edible & Medicinal Plants! 1109 E. Concord St. • Orlando, FL 32803


407-595-3731 My Herbal Herbal Beauty &


Edible Heirlooms Old-Fashioned Fruits and Veggies Return to the Table by Avery Mack


O


f the 7,500 varieties of apples in the world, 2,500 are grown in the U.S., but only 100


commercially. As of the 1990s, 70 percent were Red Delicious; more recently they’re being replaced with Gala, Granny Smith and Fuji types from taller, thinner trees that can be planted more compactly for easier harvesting, yet are more sensitive to disease and require trellis supports. Mass-produced fruits and vegetables


have been modifi ed over the years to make them look appealing and ship well, while sacrifi cing taste. Consumers in search of health-enhancing nutrients and robust fl avor can fi nd them by instead connecting with the past through food and fl owers. “Heirloom seeds have remained intact and unexposed to commercial


32 Central Florida natural awakenings


pesticides,” says Jere Gettle, owner of Baker Creek Seed Company, in Mansfi eld, Missouri. “They’re reliable—plants grown now will be the same next year; not so with hybrids.” This cleaner, tastier alternative to the status quo is typically packed with more good vitamins than good looks. Heirloom produce often also delivers a unique regional fl avor, such as Vidalia onions or Hatch chile peppers.


Exemplary Fruits Fine restaurants like to feature Yellow Wonder wild strawberries because they taste like cream. The fragrant Baron von Solemacher strawberry, an antique German Alpine variety, is small and sweet, red and full of fl avor; it’s been around since the Stone Age.


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