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Hunt House in the Claude Johnson Link. The Club was also presented with a restored 20hp chassis, which has proved to be invaluable at technical seminars ever since. In addition, a large group of Charles Rolls’s personal scrapbooks was purchased at auction by Rolls-Royce Motors and generously donated to the Foundation. By 1990, the membership had topped 5,400 and the Club accounts showed a profit of £11,000. The 1991 Annual Rally attracted well over 1,000 Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars. Later that same year, one of the Club’s finest driving events was organised in Norway – a week of perfect weather and the most stunning routes imaginable, alongside the vast, mirror-flat and scenic fords, with colourful villages on the waterside. And in September, the fourth Euro Rally was based at Reims, France. The SHRMF had designed a beautiful circular


car badge with a navy enamel background, which prompted the production of a matching Club badge as an alternative to the old vertical radiator design. The new badge carried the Bentley logo in addition to the traditional Gothic elegance. As nearly 25 per cent of the Club members owned Bentley cars from Derby and Crewe, it seemed a most appropriate choice. Subscriptions for July 1991 showed no


increase, remaining at £30 for the UK, £25 for overseas and £5 for spouse members. In early 1992, Philip Hall (later to become


Chief Executive of SHRMF), in liaison with Richard Mann (who worked at Rolls-Royce’s Hythe Road premises), collected 500 boxes containing 15,000 coachwork drawings: space at The Hunt House was shrinking rapidly. By March, membership had reached 7,600 and the New Members List continued to announce an influx of post-1965 cars.


In June 1992, an event for 20hps was run


by the Central Southern and Oxford Sections at the traditional venues of Weston Manor Hotel and Blenheim Palace. It attracted a great turnout, which in turn led the General Secretary to suggest the formation of registers, for members who own particular models. The suggestion was accepted and registers continue to prove popular to this day. A very successful Historic Weekend was


held in November 1992. The subjects covered were the Schneider Trophy, the Experimental Cars (a brilliant presentation by Ian Rimmer), the Red Arrows RAF display team and an excellent dissertation by John Kennedy on the 1913 Alpine Rally. The General Secretary, Eric Barrass, talked at length on the Rolls-Royce armoured cars – a subject dear to his heart. The opening of the CS Rolls Wing, which, along


with the Barrass Building, was masterminded by local Club member Douglas Vaughan, took place on 5 September 1992. The size and splendour of the wing was hugely impressive: the magnificent blue velvet, electrically operated curtains covering the back wall, the cheering when the modern projection units lit the retractable screen and the applause when the recently installed electric hoist raised a bust of Sir Henry Royce into view. The considerable archive area above the lecture hall addressed the Club’s problem of a shortage of space, at least for the time being. The Euro Rally was held in Luxembourg.


For the first time, the Continental members outnumbered those from the UK, with Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, France, Switzerland and Germany all represented. In 1993, new Chairman Brian Wiggins had plans drawn up and tenders sought for the


proposed linking corridor between The Hunt House and the Barrass Building. The cost was £25,000 and in a short time this cloister, dedicated to Claude Johnson, was opened. Due to the remarkable research carried out


by John Kennedy, the Great Alpine Rally in June 1993, organised for both RREC and 20 Ghost Club members, covered much of the original route of 1913. John owns and restored 2260E, the car that Radley drove in the 1913 event, with meticulous detail. The 47 Silver Ghosts that took part all successfully completed the difficult 1,200-mile drive without casualties. The Loibl Pass was opened especially for the rally: 12 hairpins and an unmetalled road rising 900 feet in little more than a mile provided gradients of up to 29 per cent. The event started and finished in Vienna. The archives at The Hunt House were


attracting many researchers. The most ardent and dedicated was John Fasal, whose books on the 20hp and the Edwardian Rolls-Royce (with John Goodman) are both classics. Unless the RREC had acquired and developed The Hunt House complex and taken ownership of materials that otherwise faced destruction, such books could not have been produced. HRH Prince Michael of Kent paid what was


scheduled to be a short visit to The Hunt House and stayed for more than five hours. As President of the Institute of the Motor Industry, the Prince kindly presented the General Secretary with a framed citation from the institute in recognition of over 30 years of service. Discussions took place with Michael Forrest,


whose superb technical articles in The Bulletin were much enjoyed, on his idea of preserving originality by means of a Conservation Class for


THE ENTHUSIAST 11


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