This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
84 | 85


The PS squad coaching staff put in considerable time working on the players' confi dence in 1v1 and 2v2 situations so that players could receive the ball and exploit the opposition


TECHNICAL ASPECTS


Tournament Futsal – from a technical/ tactical perspective we needed to have the fl exibility to adapt according to the opposition that we were facing so our pre-tournament training camps became mini-tournament camps, playing a game each day using the tactics and strategies according to the opposition (all our games were against fully sighted English National League futsal teams).


Quality play through central areas – in previous tournaments we had struggled to score goals when teams played a deep lying defence – in the build-up games we practiced a strategy which would develop movement patterns which aided players to exploit space in central areas high up the pitch. It was important for the players to see these movement patterns in game like situations so that they were confi dent in executing the plan during the tournament – we wanted players to see cues and triggers in real time to encourage fl exibility and creativity of movement and to make the right decision at the right time.


Ability to play out of the press – at international level it is critical to be able to play out of a half or full court press. We developed a strategy which became highly eff ective in the semi-fi nal which allowed the players to be confi dent of retaining the ball under the high pressure of a full court press – we also found that this was also linked to getting certain individual players on court and in the right areas of the pitch at key periods of the game.


Dominate 1v1 situations – a considerable amount of technical work during the training camps was spent in opposed practice in tight areas working on 1v1 and 2v2 situations -we needed to build confi dence so that players were able to receive the ball and exploit the opposition in 1v1 situations – we feel this is about being able to deal with the ball under pressure which could be at any point on the court.


Quality fi nishing – from the outset it was felt that games would be decided by single goals and this turned out to be the case in Sendai. On refl ection we spent a great amount of time on fi nishing from open play and from set plays and this could still be an area for development -our practice was predominately opposed practice where clever fi nishes were encouraged.


Tracking runners and building pressure through defence – playing against fully sighted national league teams forced the players to be extremely good at this aspect of play when it came to the tournament – importantly players got better at anticipating and blocking runs and this supported our desire to ensure that defensively we were compact. At international level being disciplined in defence and being able to defend for long periods of the game can be advantageous in building pressure on the opposition.


The use of IT – at international level, video analysis is critical. Sports code was used to feedback to players about their previous performances both individually and as a team and to highlight strengths and weaknesses of the opposition that we would be facing. Games were coded during play which enabled feedback to be available to the coaching staff at half time and immediately after the game. With matches taking place daily it was important to pin point key areas of play quickly.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92