This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
46 | 47


Every four years the world unites around a single football tournament where creativity, imagination, skill, finesse and passion are on display. In 2010, figures showed that half the world tuned into the World Cup Final in South Africa. The game was broadcast in every country across the globe.


Global icons such as Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo, Neymar and Franck Ribery are already household names to young grassroots players throughout the country and the extensive coverage they will be afforded through every media outlet this summer will only strengthen their reputations.


As the tournament nears you can be sure that young players will turn up to practice sporting the colourful kits of competing countries, names of superstars on their back, full of enthusiasm to emulate their idols with a real desire to re-enact the skills, tricks and goals they’ve seen beamed through the television screen.


As such, this summer’s competition offers a fantastic opportunity for coaches of young players to harness the enthusiasm for the world game using a tournament theme to develop effective learning and development environments.


How to run a grassroots tournament


Teams Picking teams can be done in any number of ways and all may have some value depending on what you want to achieve from your tournament.


Splitting your squad into a minimum of four teams allows you to run a World Cup group with enough fixtures for variety. Even better if you have more players, as each game is a fresh start in the mind of your players – another opportunity to self-correct and retry different things.


Who gets to be which country is where you may have to use your mediation skills, perhaps allowing the players to take ownership of coming up with a rationale as to why they need to be Ronaldo and Portugal.


Fixtures Once any tournament is underway, players and teams will want to have a go at playing against all the other teams and why would they not – it’s not every day you get to play against the USA and Argentina.


With most coaching sessions lasting only an hour it might not be possible to cram every fixture into a training evening. With the official tournament taking place over a month, and your players no doubt hooked to the spectacle throughout, you can utilise the tournament theme from session to session.


See the fixture scheduling overleaf for a variety of different ways of formatting fixtures and how a tournament can work over a number of weeks.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92