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takeoff and landing—they will not be in danger. Their helicopter will just continue on its heading as if nothing happened. Should IIMC occur during takeoff or landing, autopilot provides an easy escape for human pilots: “They can just resort to autopilot and their helicopter will level


itself,” says Helweg. “This gives the pilot the chance to recover and assess the situation before making their next move.”


Autopilots also give single pilots the chance to reduce their workload. “Input fatigue is a constant issue for HAA


pilots, especially when they are alone and flying in demanding situations,” Helweg says. “By programming in their heading and altitude into the autopilot before takeoff, and then being able to let the autopilot take over until it is time to land, HAA pilots can experience less demanding,


less tiring transports. Given how tough HAA transports can be, reducing pilot in-flight workloads wherever we can is a good idea.”


Truly Useful Tool


Both the Bell 407GXP autopilot and the Genesys Aerosystem HeliSAS Autopilot and Stability Augmentation System being implemented are two-axis flight management systems. This means they can control the helicopter’s pitch and roll, plus keep its heading and altitude by comparing the preprogrammed course with the aircraft’s real-time altimeter and GPS location data.


Genesys Aerosystem’s HeliSAS system is a good example of what an autopilot can provide for a light single helicopter (either piston or turbine). Weighing just 15 pounds, the unit is designed to be operational during all aspects of flight, with the pilot overriding it by assuming manual control during takeoff and landing. The pilot can also override the HeliSAS system during flight by moving the cyclic stick. Left to its own devices, the HeliSAS works within pitch trim limits from +11 degrees to -6 degrees, and roll trim limits from +5 degrees to -5 degrees.


“Helicopter pilots using our HeliSAS tend to rely on it for 80 to 90 percent of their flights,’ says Jamie Luster, Genesys Aerosystem’s director of sales and marketing. “It truly is a useful tool.”


JA97-002


Audio Controller with RX Volume Control • Individual volume controls • 7 users • 6 Coms • 5 Rx • 2 Alerts • Customizable legends • NVG compatible lighting • Built in adapter for Non-Aircraft Radios• • Cell phone operation mode


• Tx capability for pilot, co-pilot & 2 passengers AS9100 CERTIFIED 800-527-2581 | 214-320-9770 www.dallasavionics.com rotorcraftpro.com 57


The Future of Avionics Today


JA95-N70


Audio Controller with RX Volume Control • Individual volume controls • 7 users • 5 Coms + PA • 6 Rx • 3 Alerts • Customizable legends • NVG compatible lighting • Built in adapter for Non-Aircraft Radios• • Cell phone operation mode


• Tx capability for pilot, co-pilot & 2 passengers • Approvals: FAA TSO C139 & TC CAN-TSO C139


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