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6. Maintenance staff is not properly trained to maintain NVIS-equipped aircraft:


In accordance with FAA FAR Part 145 and/or Part 43 maintenance technicians are required to have the tools, training and know-how to accomplish the maintenance. NVIS cockpit modifications are not extremely difficult to maintain and/or install, but special procedures and training are necessary to accomplish these tasks. For example, familiarity and operational training on the NVGs is critical so an A&P can correctly perform an NVIS light-leak check after an equipment replacement/modification. When queried by the FAA, a technician and/or company will need to be able to address this issue, as well as provide evidence for how they comply with the regulation.


7. Overconfidence in the cockpit:


Once crews begin using NVGs, it’s quite common for their confidence to increase rapidly. Sort of like swimming, as long as you don’t have a cramp while in the deep end, you’re probably OK. Too often, however, pilots are flying their helicopters deep into weather beyond their capabilities and leaving themselves with minimal options to maintain visual meteorological conditions (VMC). This is especially hazardous in low-light areas. Training and awareness is the key; see 5 on prevous page.


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